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Wildfire Risk and Housing Prices: A Case Study from Colorado Springs


  • Geoffrey H. Donovan
  • Patricia A. Champ
  • David T. Butry


In 2000, concerned about the risks of wildfires to local homes, the Colorado Springs Fire Department rated the wildfire risk of 35,000 housing parcels within the wildland-urban interface and made its findings available online. We examine the effectiveness of this rating project by comparing the relationship between home price and wildfire risk before and after the information was posted on the Web site. Before the information was available, home price and wildfire risk were positively correlated, whereas, afterwards, they were not.

Suggested Citation

  • Geoffrey H. Donovan & Patricia A. Champ & David T. Butry, 2007. "Wildfire Risk and Housing Prices: A Case Study from Colorado Springs," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 83(2), pages 217-233.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:83:y:2007:i:2:p:217-233

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    JEL classification:

    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects


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