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Educational Homogamy: How Much is Opportunities?

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  • Helena Skyt Nielsen
  • Michael Svarer

Abstract

Individuals match on length and type of education. We find that around half of the systematic sorting on education is explained by the tendency of individuals to marry someone who went to the same educational institution or to an institution near them. This may be due to low search frictions or selection of people with the same preferences into the same institutions. The residual half of the systematic sorting on education is a direct effect of partners’ education, which is potentially explained by complementarities in household production in couples with same education.

Suggested Citation

  • Helena Skyt Nielsen & Michael Svarer, 2009. "Educational Homogamy: How Much is Opportunities?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(4).
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:44:y:2009:i4:p1066-1086
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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Breen & Signe Andersen, 2012. "Educational Assortative Mating and Income Inequality in Denmark," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(3), pages 867-887, August.
    2. Lars Kirkebøen & Edwin Leuven & Magne Mogstad, 2021. "College as a Marriage Market," Discussion Papers 950, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    3. Sander Wagner & Diederik Boertien & Mette Gørtz, 2020. "The Wealth of Parents: Trends Over Time in Assortative Mating Based on Parental Wealth," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(5), pages 1809-1831, October.
    4. Gustaf Bruze, 2011. "Marriage Choices of Movie Stars: Does Spouse's Education Matter?," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(1), pages 1-28.
    5. Bicakova, Alena & Jurajda, Štepán, 2016. "Field-of-Study Homogamy," IZA Discussion Papers 9844, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Hani Mansour & Terra McKinnish, 2018. "Same-occupation spouses: preferences or search costs?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 31(4), pages 1005-1033, October.
    7. Susanne Huber & Martin Fieder, 2011. "Educational Homogamy Lowers the Odds of Reproductive Failure," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 6(7), pages 1-6, July.
    8. Daysal, N. Meltem & Elder, Todd E. & Hellerstein, Judith K. & Imberman, Scott A. & Orsini, Chiara, 2021. "Parental Skills, Assortative Mating, and the Incidence of Autism Spectrum Disorder," IZA Discussion Papers 14227, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Dionissi Aliprantis, 2013. "Covariates and causal effects: the problem of context," Working Papers (Old Series) 1310, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    10. Gustaf Bruze, 2015. "Male And Female Marriage Returns To Schooling," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 56(1), pages 207-234, February.
    11. Melis, Kristina & Campo, Katia & Lamey, Lien & Breugelmans, Els, 2016. "A Bigger Slice of the Multichannel Grocery Pie: When Does Consumers’ Online Channel Use Expand Retailers’ Share of Wallet?," Journal of Retailing, Elsevier, vol. 92(3), pages 268-286.
    12. Vincenzo Carrieri & Apostolos Davillas & Andrew M. Jones, 2020. "A latent class approach to inequity in health using biomarker data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(7), pages 808-826, July.
    13. Karly Sarita Ford, 2020. "Marrying Within the Alma Mater: Understanding the Role of Same-University Marriages in Educational Homogamy," Sociological Research Online, , vol. 25(2), pages 254-272, June.
    14. Matthew Larsen & T. McCarthy & Jeremy Moulton & Marianne Page & Ankur Patel, 2015. "War and Marriage: Assortative Mating and the World War II GI Bill," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(5), pages 1431-1461, October.
    15. Aaron Gullickson, 2021. "A counterfactual choice approach to the study of partner selection," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 44(22), pages 513-536.
    16. Alena Bičáková & Štěpán Jurajda, 2017. "Gender composition of college graduates by field of study and early fertility," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 1323-1343, December.
    17. David Ong, 2016. "Education and income attraction: an online dating field experiment," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(19), pages 1816-1830, April.
    18. Zhenchao Qian & Daniel T. Lichter, 2018. "Marriage Markets and Intermarriage: Exchange in First Marriages and Remarriages," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 55(3), pages 849-875, June.
    19. Mansour, Hani & McKinnish, Terra, 2014. "Same-Occupation Spouses: Preferences and Search Costs," IZA Discussion Papers 8370, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    20. Youjin Hahn & Kanti Nuzhat & Hee-Seung Yang, 2018. "The effect of female education on marital matches and child health in Bangladesh," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 31(3), pages 915-936, July.
    21. Gautier, Pieter A. & Svarer, Michael & Teulings, Coen N., 2010. "Marriage and the city: Search frictions and sorting of singles," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 206-218, March.
    22. Rolf Becker & Ben Jann, 2016. "Educational expansion and homogamy. An analysis of the consequences of educational upgrading for assortative mating in Switzerland," University of Bern Social Sciences Working Papers 25, University of Bern, Department of Social Sciences.

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