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Educational Homogamy: How Much is Opportunities?

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  • Helena Skyt Nielsen
  • Michael Svarer

Abstract

Individuals match on length and type of education. We find that around half of the systematic sorting on education is explained by the tendency of individuals to marry someone who went to the same educational institution or to an institution near them. This may be due to low search frictions or selection of people with the same preferences into the same institutions. The residual half of the systematic sorting on education is a direct effect of partners’ education, which is potentially explained by complementarities in household production in couples with same education.

Suggested Citation

  • Helena Skyt Nielsen & Michael Svarer, 2009. "Educational Homogamy: How Much is Opportunities?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(4).
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:44:y:2009:i4:p1066-1086
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Raquel Fernández & Nezih Guner & John Knowles, 2005. "Love and Money: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis of Household Sorting and Inequality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(1), pages 273-344.
    2. Claudia Goldin, 1992. "The Meaning of College in the Lives of American Women: The Past One-Hundred Years," NBER Working Papers 4099, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Raquel Fernández & Richard Rogerson, 2001. "Sorting and Long-Run Inequality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1305-1341.
    4. Pierre-André Chiappori & Murat Iyigun & Yoram Weiss, 2009. "Investment in Schooling and the Marriage Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(5), pages 1689-1713, December.
    5. Boulier, Bryan L & Rosenzweig, Mark R, 1984. "Schooling, Search, and Spouse Selection: Testing Economic Theories of Marriage and Household Behavior," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 92(4), pages 712-732, August.
    6. Michael Svarer, 2007. "Working Late: Do Workplace Sex Ratios Affect Partnership Formation and Dissolution?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(3).
    7. Susan Lewis & Valerie Oppenheimer, 2000. "Educational assortative mating across marriage markets: Nonhispanic whites in the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 37(1), pages 29-40, February.
    8. Becker, Gary S, 1973. "A Theory of Marriage: Part I," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(4), pages 813-846, July-Aug..
    9. Lisa Jepsen & Christopher Jepsen, 2002. "An empirical analysis of the matching patterns of same-sex and opposite-sex couples," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 39(3), pages 435-453, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Breen & Signe Andersen, 2012. "Educational Assortative Mating and Income Inequality in Denmark," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(3), pages 867-887, August.
    2. repec:kap:reveho:v:15:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11150-015-9309-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Alena Bicakova & Stepan Jurajda, 2016. "Field-of-Study Homogamy," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp561, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    4. David Ong, 2016. "Education and income attraction: an online dating field experiment," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(19), pages 1816-1830, April.
    5. repec:spr:demogr:v:55:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s13524-018-0671-x is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Gustaf Bruze, 2011. "Marriage Choices of Movie Stars: Does Spouse's Education Matter?," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(1), pages 1-28.
    7. repec:spr:jopoec:v:31:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s00148-017-0670-z is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Mansour, Hani & McKinnish, Terra, 2014. "Same-Occupation Spouses: Preferences and Search Costs," IZA Discussion Papers 8370, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. repec:spr:jopoec:v:31:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s00148-017-0673-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Dionissi Aliprantis, 2013. "Covariates and causal effects: the problem of context," Working Papers (Old Series) 1310, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    11. repec:eee:jouret:v:92:y:2016:i:3:p:268-286 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Matthew Larsen & T. McCarthy & Jeremy Moulton & Marianne Page & Ankur Patel, 2015. "War and Marriage: Assortative Mating and the World War II GI Bill," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(5), pages 1431-1461, October.
    13. Gautier, Pieter A. & Svarer, Michael & Teulings, Coen N., 2010. "Marriage and the city: Search frictions and sorting of singles," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 206-218, March.
    14. Rolf Becker & Ben Jann, 2016. "Educational expansion and homogamy. An analysis of the consequences of educational upgrading for assortative mating in Switzerland," University of Bern Social Sciences Working Papers 25, University of Bern, Department of Social Sciences.

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