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Self-Employment, Family Background, and Race

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Hout
  • Harvey Rosen

Abstract

The offspring of self-employed fathers are more likely than others to become self-employed. Thus the historically low rates of self-employment among African-Americans and Latinos may contribute to their low contemporary rates. National data show that African-Americans and Latinos whose fathers were self-employed have lower rates of self-employment than other men whose fathers were not self-employed. Other aspects of family background explain only a small portion of the self-employment gap between African-Americans and native-born white ancestry groups. Male immigrants who have self-employed fathers overseas are no more likely to be self-employed than other immigrants are.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Hout & Harvey Rosen, 2000. "Self-Employment, Family Background, and Race," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(4), pages 670-692.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:35:y:2000:i:4:p:670-692
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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