IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ucp/jpolec/v105y1997i1p153-77.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Chicago, Harvard, and the Doctrinal Foundations of Monetary Economics

Author

Listed:
  • Tavlas, George S

Abstract

The relationship between Milton Friedman's monetary economics and the views espoused by Chicago and non-Chicago quantity theorists in 1930-36 is examined. Contrary to recent interpretations, Chicago economists advanced the efficacy of monetary policy as the means of escaping from the Great Depression if such a policy was implemented with budget deficits to generate monetary expansion. The use of the quantity theory of money to provide a theoretical rationale for budget deficits distinguished the Chicago economists from other quantity theorists and left them less susceptible to the Keynesian revolution. The claim that Harvard was an important center for monetary research in the early 1930s is refuted. Copyright 1997 by the University of Chicago.

Suggested Citation

  • Tavlas, George S, 1997. "Chicago, Harvard, and the Doctrinal Foundations of Monetary Economics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(1), pages 153-177, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:105:y:1997:i:1:p:153-77
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/262069
    File Function: full text
    Download Restriction: Access to the online full text or PDF requires a subscription.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Henry C. Simons, 1934. "Economic Reconstruction: The Columbia Report," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 42, pages 795-795.
    2. Michael D. Bordo & Anna J. Schwartz, 1987. "Clark Warburton: Pioneer Monetarist," NBER Chapters,in: Money in Historical Perspective, pages 234-254 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Milton Friedman & Anna J. Schwartz, 1963. "A Monetary History of the United States, 1867–1960," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number frie63-1.
    4. Moggridge, Donald E & Howson, Susan, 1974. "Keynes on Monetary Policy, 1910-1946," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(2), pages 226-247, July.
    5. Laidler, David, 1993. "Hawtrey, Harvard, and the Origins of the Chicago Tradition," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(6), pages 1068-1103, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Loef, Hans E. & Monissen, Hans G., 1999. "Monetary policy and monetary reform: Irving Fisher's contributions to monetary macroeconomics," W.E.P. - Würzburg Economic Papers 11, University of Würzburg, Chair for Monetary Policy and International Economics.
    2. Steindl, Frank G., 1998. "The Decline of a Paradigm: The Quantity Theory and Recovery in the 1930s," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 821-841, October.
    3. Soldatos, Gerasimos T. & Varelas, Erotokritos, 2014. "The Chicago Tradition and Commercial Bank Seigniorage," MPRA Paper 57721, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Hugh Rockoff, 2000. "Henry Calvert Simons and the Quantity Theory of Money," Departmental Working Papers 200003, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    5. George S. Tavlas, 2015. "In Old Chicago: Simons, Friedman, and the Development of Monetary‐Policy Rules," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(1), pages 99-121, February.
    6. David Laidler & Roger Sandilands, 2010. "Harvard, the Chicago Tradition, and the Quantity Theory: A Reply to James Ahiakpor," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 42(3), pages 573-592, Fall.
    7. Moe Thorvald Grung, 2013. "Control of Finance as a Prerequisite for Successful Monetary Policy: A Reinterpretation of Henry Simons’ “Rules versus Authorities in Monetary Policy”," Accounting, Economics, and Law: A Convivium, De Gruyter, vol. 3(3), pages 1-18, April.
    8. Sebastian Edwards, 2015. "Academics as Economic Advisers: Gold, the ‘Brains Trust,’ and FDR," NBER Working Papers 21380, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. repec:kap:openec:v:28:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11079-017-9435-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Frederick Guy & Neil Perry & Andrei Shleifer & Andrew Metrick & Martin L. Weitzman & Barbara R. Bergmann & David Laidler & George S. Tavlas, 1999. "Correspondence," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 235-242, Summer.
    11. Aschheim, Joseph & Tavlas, George S., 2004. "Academic exclusion: the case of Alexander Del Mar," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 31-60, March.
    12. Soldatos, Gerasimos T. & Varelas, Erotokritos, 2017. "Firms’ rational expectations, workers’ psychology, and monetary policy in a behavioral real business cycle model," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 129-139.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:105:y:1997:i:1:p:153-77. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Journals Division). General contact details of provider: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JPE/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.