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Hawtrey, Harvard, and the Origins of the Chicago Tradition

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  • Laidler, D.

Abstract

Milton Friedman has claimed that his monetary economics derives from a Chicago tradition that, in the 1930s, offered a monetary explanation of cyclical fluctuations in general and the Great Depression in particular, an optimistic view of the power of monetary policy, and a case for governing it by rules rather than discretion. It is argued that all the elements of this tradition except the last are to be found in earlier writings of Ralph Hawtrey, Allyn Young, and Lauchlin Currie and that there is much evidence to point to a direct influence running from Hawtrey, through Harvard, to Chicago. Copyright 1993 by University of Chicago Press.
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Suggested Citation

  • Laidler, D., 1993. "Hawtrey, Harvard, and the Origins of the Chicago Tradition," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 9302, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwo:uwowop:9302
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    Cited by:

    1. Tavlas, George S, 1997. "Chicago, Harvard, and the Doctrinal Foundations of Monetary Economics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(1), pages 153-177, February.
    2. Steindl, Frank G., 1998. "The Decline of a Paradigm: The Quantity Theory and Recovery in the 1930s," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 821-841, October.
    3. Bordo, Michael D. & Rockoff, Hugh, 2013. "The Influence Of Irving Fisher On Milton Friedman’S Monetary Economics," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 35(02), pages 153-177, June.
    4. Hugh Rockoff, 2010. "On the Origins of A Monetary History," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to the Chicago School of Economics, chapter 7 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Sebastiano Nerozzi, 2011. "From the Great Depression to Bretton Woods: Jacob Viner and international monetary stabilization (1930-1945)," The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(1), pages 55-84.
    6. Hugh Rockoff, 2000. "Henry Calvert Simons and the Quantity Theory of Money," Departmental Working Papers 200003, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    7. George S. Tavlas, 2015. "In Old Chicago: Simons, Friedman, and the Development of Monetary‐Policy Rules," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 47(1), pages 99-121, February.
    8. David Laidler & Roger Sandilands, 2010. "Harvard, the Chicago Tradition, and the Quantity Theory: A Reply to James Ahiakpor," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 42(3), pages 573-592, Fall.
    9. Moe Thorvald Grung, 2013. "Control of Finance as a Prerequisite for Successful Monetary Policy: A Reinterpretation of Henry Simons’ “Rules versus Authorities in Monetary Policy”," Accounting, Economics, and Law: A Convivium, De Gruyter, vol. 3(3), pages 1-18, April.
    10. Dittmer, Kristofer, 2015. "100 percent reserve banking: A critical review of green perspectives," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 9-16.
    11. Frederick Guy & Neil Perry & Andrei Shleifer & Andrew Metrick & Martin L. Weitzman & Barbara R. Bergmann & David Laidler & George S. Tavlas, 1999. "Correspondence," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 235-242, Summer.
    12. Roger Sandilands, 2009. "New Evidence on Allyn Youngs Style and Influence as a Teacher," Working Papers 0905, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    13. Roger Sandilands, 2009. "An Archival Case Study: Revisiting The Life and Political Economy of Lauchlin Currie," Working Papers 0906, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    14. Roger J. Sandilands, 2009. "Solovian and New Growth Theory from the Perspective of Allyn Young on Macroeconomic Increasing Returns," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 41(5), pages 285-303, Supplemen.
    15. Sandilands, Roger, 2009. "New Evidence on Allyn Young’s Style and Influence as a Teacher," SIRE Discussion Papers 2009-16, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    16. Clara Elisabetta Mattei, 2016. "Hawtrey, Austerity, and the "Treasury View", 1918-25," LEM Papers Series 2016/02, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    17. Perry Mehrling, 2002. "Retrospectives: Economists and the Fed: Beginnings," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(4), pages 207-218, Fall.

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