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Education and Income Growth: Implications for Cross-Country Inequality

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  • O'Neill, Donal

Abstract

This paper examines the extent to which patterns of human capital convergence can account for observed patterns of income inequality between countries. The author decomposes national income into three components: one due to education levels, one reflecting the return to education, and a residual component. He then examines the contribution of each to changes in income dispersion. Among the developed countries, convergence in education levels has resulted in a reduction in income dispersion. However, for the world as a whole, incomes have diverged despite substantial convergence in education levels. Copyright 1995 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • O'Neill, Donal, 1995. "Education and Income Growth: Implications for Cross-Country Inequality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(6), pages 1289-1301, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:103:y:1995:i:6:p:1289-1301
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Barro, Robert J. & Lee, Jong-Wha, 1993. "International comparisons of educational attainment," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 363-394, December.
    2. Abramovitz, Moses, 1986. "Catching Up, Forging Ahead, and Falling Behind," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(02), pages 385-406, June.
    3. Levine, Ross & Renelt, David, 1992. "A Sensitivity Analysis of Cross-Country Growth Regressions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 942-963, September.
    4. Kyriacou, George A., 1991. "Level and Growth Effects of Human Capital: A Cross-Country Study of the Convergence Hypothesis," Working Papers 91-26, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
    5. Baumol, William J, 1986. "Productivity Growth, Convergence, and Welfare: What the Long-run Data Show," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(5), pages 1072-1085, December.
    6. Romer, Paul M., 1990. "Human capital and growth: Theory and evidence," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 251-286, January.
    7. Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, 1994. "Cross-sectional regressions and the empirics of economic growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(3-4), pages 739-747, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Coen Teulings & Thijs van Rens, 2008. "Education, Growth, and Income Inequality," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(1), pages 89-104, February.
    2. Herbst, Mikolaj & Wójcik, Piotr, 2011. "Growth and divergence of the polish subregions over 1995–2006: a search for determinants and spatial patterns," MPRA Paper 34731, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Abhijeet, Chandra, 2010. "Does Government Expenditure on Education Promote Economic Growth? An Econometric Analysis," MPRA Paper 25480, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. O'Neill, D. & Van Kerm P., 2003. "A New Approach for Analysing Income Convergence across Countries," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n1261003, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
    5. Maite Blázquez & José Ramos, 2008. "Disparidades entre educación formal y educación en el puesto de trabajo," Revista de Economía Laboral - Spanish Journal of Labour Economics, Asociación Española de Economía Laboral - AEET, vol. 5, pages 1-32.
    6. Morris Altman, 2003. "Economic Growth and Income Equality: Implications of a Behavioural Model of Economic Growth for Pub lic Policy," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 29(s1), pages 87-118, January.
    7. Robert A.J. Dur & Coen N. Teulings, 2001. "Education and Efficient Redistribution," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 01-090/3, Tinbergen Institute, revised 12 Jun 2003.
    8. Digdowiseiso, Kumba, 2010. "Measuring gini coefficient of education: the Indonesian cases," MPRA Paper 19865, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Daniele Checchi, 2000. "Does educational achievement help to explain income inequality?," Departmental Working Papers 2000-11, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
    10. Salwa TRABELSI, 2013. "Regional Inequality Of Education In Tunisia: An Evaluation By The Gini Index," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 37, pages 95-117.
    11. Checchi, Daniele, 2001. "Education, inequality and income inequality," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6566, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    12. Chun-Hung Lin, 2007. "Education Expansion, Educational Inequality, and Income Inequality: Evidence from Taiwan, 1976–2003," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 80(3), pages 601-615, February.
    13. Diego Restuccia & Carlos Urrutia, 1999. "Public Policy, Price Distortions, and Investment Rates," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 9901, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.
    14. Monica Ospina, 2009. "The effect of social spending on income inequality:An analysis for Latin American countries," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO CIEF 010620, UNIVERSIDAD EAFIT.
    15. Spruk, Rok, 2011. "Productivity and income convergence in transition: theory and evidence from Central Europe," MPRA Paper 33389, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Restuccia, Diego & Urrutia, Carlos, 2001. "Relative prices and investment rates," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 93-121, February.
    17. Hernando Zuleta, 2004. "A Note on Scale Effects," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 7(1), pages 237-242, January.
    18. Ren, Yu & Yuan, Yufei & Zhang, Yang, 2014. "Human capital, household capital and asset returns," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 11-22.

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