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Reviving Growth in the Arab World

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  • Elbadawi, Ibrahim A

Abstract

Why has growth in the Arab world been so disappointing? Stagnating since 1985, the little growth that does exist is volatile and unstable, and the region has lagged behind both the gains of other developing countries and the region's own pre-1985 performance. This article attempts to encourage the revitalization of growth in the Arab world by addressing the following two questions: why has growth been so low, specifically in comparison to the high performers of East Asia, and why has it been so erratic and unstable? I estimate two growth models of the determinants of long-term growth and the persistence of growth, using global panel data drawn from more than 70 countries. I conclude by describing two strategies and one development constraint important in explaining the growth process specific to the Arab world.

Suggested Citation

  • Elbadawi, Ibrahim A, 2005. "Reviving Growth in the Arab World," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(2), pages 293-326, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:y:2005:v:53:i:2:p:293-326
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/425375
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    Cited by:

    1. Ali Abdel Gadir Ali, "undated". "The Political Economy of Inequality in the Arab Region and Relevant Development Policies," API-Working Paper Series 0904, Arab Planning Institute - Kuwait, Information Center.
    2. Artelaris, Panagiotis & Arvanitidis, Paschalis & Petrakos, George, 2006. "Theoretical and Methodological Study on Dynamic Growth Regions and Factors Explaining their Growth Performance," Papers DYNREG02, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    3. Ali Abdel Gadir Ali, 2009. "The Political Economy of Inequality in the Arab Region and Relevant Development Policies," Working Papers 502, Economic Research Forum, revised Aug 2009.
    4. Kshetri, Nir & Ajami, Riad, 2008. "Institutional reforms in the Gulf Cooperation Council economies: A conceptual framework," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 300-318, September.
    5. Bougharriou, Nouha & Benayed, Walid & Gabsi, Foued Badr, 2018. "The democracy and economic growth nexus: Do FDI and government spending matter? Evidence from the Arab world," Economics Discussion Papers 2018-17, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    6. Zouheir Abida & Imen Mohamed Sghaier & Nahed Zghidi, 2015. "Financial Development and Economic Growth: Evidence from North African Countries," Economic Alternatives, University of National and World Economy, Sofia, Bulgaria, issue 2, pages 17-33, April.

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