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Arrests, Persistent Youth Joblessness, and Black/White Employment Differentials

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  • Grogger, Jeff

Abstract

Economists have long been concerned with the labor market problems of young men. Recently, research has indicated that one-fourth to one-half of all men are active in crime at some point during their youth. Furthermore, joblessness and criminal activity vary similarly by age and race. The author analyzes two data sets containing arrest and employment information to assess whether criminal activities may underlie persistent joblessness and black/white employment differential among young men. Two different approaches are taken to control for individual heterogeneity. Arrests generate some persistence in non-employment. Moreover, arrests account for nearly two-thirds of the black/white employment differential in a sample of arrestees, and nearly one-third of the difference in a more general sample. Copyright 1992 by MIT Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Grogger, Jeff, 1992. "Arrests, Persistent Youth Joblessness, and Black/White Employment Differentials," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(1), pages 100-106, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:74:y:1992:i:1:p:100-106
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    Cited by:

    1. Rasmusen, Eric, 1996. "Stigma and Self-Fulfilling Expectations of Criminality," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 39(2), pages 519-543, October.
    2. Nagin, Daniel & Waldfogel, Joel, 1998. "The Effect of Conviction on Income Through the Life Cycle," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 25-40, March.
    3. Bacolod, Marigee & Joseph Hotz, V., 2006. "Cohort changes in the transition from school to work: Evidence from three NLS surveys," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 351-373, August.
    4. Marigee Bacolod & V. Joseph Hotz, 2005. "Cohort Changes in the Transition from School to Work: What Changed and What Consequences Did it have for Wages?," Working Papers 050618, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics.
    5. repec:eee:labchp:v:3:y:1999:i:pc:p:3085-3139 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. K. A. Kost, "undated". ""A man without a job is a dead man": The meaning of work and welfare in the lives of young men," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1112-96, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    7. Denis Fougère & Francis Kramarz & Julien Pouget, 2009. "Youth Unemployment and Crime in France," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 7(5), pages 909-938, September.
    8. Nagin, Daniel & Waldfogel, Joel, 1995. "The effects of criminality and conviction on the labor market status of young British offenders," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 109-126, January.
    9. Israel, Mark & Seeborg, Michael, 1998. "The impact of youth characteristics and experiences on transitions out of poverty," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 753-776.
    10. Holzer, Harry J., 2007. "Collateral Costs: The Effects of Incarceration on the Employment and Earnings of Young Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 3118, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Tang, Chor Foon & Lean, Hooi Hooi, 2009. "New evidence from the misery index in the crime function," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 102(2), pages 112-115, February.
    12. Robert W. Fairlie, 2002. "Drug Dealing and Legitimate Self-Employment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(3), pages 538-567, July.
    13. Bedard, Kelly & Helland, Eric, 2004. "The location of women's prisons and the deterrence effect of "harder" time," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 147-167, June.
    14. Brian A. Jacob & Lars Lefgren, 2003. "Are Idle Hands the Devil's Workshop? Incapacitation, Concentration, and Juvenile Crime," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1560-1577, December.

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