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Endogenous Output in an Aggregate Model of the Labor Market

  • Quandt, Richard E
  • Rosen, Harvey S

Most aggregative labor market models contain a marginal productivity expression in which the quantity of labor appears on the left hand side of the equation, and the right hand side includes the real wage and output. Some researchers have cautioned that if the output variable is treated as exogenous, econometric difficulties may result. However, the assumption that output is exogenous has not been tested. The authors estimate an equilibrium model of the labor market, and use it to test the assumption of output exogeneity. The assumption that output is exogenous cannot be rejected by the data. Copyright 1989 by MIT Press.

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Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Review of Economics & Statistics.

Volume (Year): 71 (1989)
Issue (Month): 3 (August)
Pages: 394-400

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:71:y:1989:i:3:p:394-400
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  1. Robert J. Barro & Chaipat Sahasakul, 1983. "Measuring the Average Marginal Tax Rate from the Individual Income Tax," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 26, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
  2. Richard Quandt & Harvey Rosen, 1985. "Unemployment, Disequilibrium and the Short-Run Phillips Curve: An Econometric Approach," Working Papers 582, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  3. Symons, J & Layard, R, 1984. "Neoclassical Demand for Labour Functions for Six Major Economies," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 94(376), pages 788-99, December.
  4. Paul M. Romer, 1987. "Crazy Explanations for the Productivity Slowdown," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1987, Volume 2, pages 163-210 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Lucas, Robert E, Jr & Rapping, Leonard A, 1969. "Real Wages, Employment, and Inflation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 77(5), pages 721-54, Sept./Oct.
  6. Altonji, Joseph G, 1982. "The Intertemporal Substitution Model of Labour Market Fluctuations: An Empirical Analysis," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(5), pages 783-824, Special I.
  7. Matthew D. Shapiro, 1985. "Capital Utilization and Capital Accumulation: Theory and Evidence," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 736, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  8. Andrews, Martyn & Nickell, Stephen J, 1986. "A Disaggregated Disequilibrium Model of the Labour Market," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(3), pages 386-402, November.
  9. Pagan, Adrian, 1984. "Econometric Issues in the Analysis of Regressions with Generated Regressors," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 25(1), pages 221-47, February.
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