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Ocean acidification in the Middle East and North African region

Author

Listed:
  • Nathalie HILMI

    () (Centre Scientifique de Monaco)

  • Alain SAFA

    (Skill Partners)

  • Victor PLANAS-BIELSA

    (Centre Scientifique de Monaco)

  • Yasser KADMIRI

    (Université de Toulon)

  • Mine CINAR

    (Loyola University of Chicago)

Abstract

After examining the current state of knowledge about ocean acidification in Middle East and North African (MENA) countries, we model the socio-economic impacts of disasters, ocean acidification and ecological risk. We use Extreme Value Theory and Peak Over Threshold concept to define the critical threshold point for ocean pH value as an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, initially with Gaussian noise. We define the benchmark pH based on time series observations which exhibit moderate to large variations and use Monte Carlo simulations and also model non-Gaussian cases to examine the probability of disasters.

Suggested Citation

  • Nathalie HILMI & Alain SAFA & Victor PLANAS-BIELSA & Yasser KADMIRI & Mine CINAR, 2017. "Ocean acidification in the Middle East and North African region," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 46, pages 43-57.
  • Handle: RePEc:tou:journl:v:46:y:2017:p:43-57
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Ocean acidification ; MENA countries ; Environmental disasters ; Stochastic processes;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C02 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - General - - - Mathematical Economics
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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