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Trade openness and economic growth volatility: An empirical investigation

Author

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  • Kwame Mireku
  • Ellen Animah Agyei
  • Daniel Domeher
  • Kwok Tong Soo

Abstract

This paper investigated the impact of trade openness on economic growth volatility of Ghana from 1970 to 2013, using cointegration and error correction techniques. Our findings show that both the long and short run economic growth volatility is positively influenced by changes in trade openness. Volatility in domestic credit to private sector, shocks after the economic liberalization and financial openness contributed negative to economic growth volatility in the short run. The major policy implication of our paper is that developing economies should take into consideration their own realities in their trade policies to limit economic growth volatility.

Suggested Citation

  • Kwame Mireku & Ellen Animah Agyei & Daniel Domeher & Kwok Tong Soo, 2017. "Trade openness and economic growth volatility: An empirical investigation," Cogent Economics & Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 1385438-138, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:oaefxx:v:5:y:2017:i:1:p:1385438
    DOI: 10.1080/23322039.2017.1385438
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    References listed on IDEAS

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