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Monetary policy and trade imbalance adjustment


  • Zhigang Huang


The paper sets up a small open economy general equilibrium model to study the dynamics of the adjustment of trade imbalances under different policies based on the Chinese economy. The policies that adjust domestic prices require a long period to achieve trade balance and induce fluctuations of output and inflation, regardless of whether capital markets are open or closed, while policies that adjust the exchange rate quickly result in diminished trade surpluses, and do not cause fluctuations of output and inflation. However, policies that adjust the exchange rate slowly also lead to fluctuations under a capital flow setting. Nominal frictions are important factors to these differences, because they slow down the price adjustment, but do not bother the exchange rate changes. From the perspective of welfare, fast exchange rate adjustment policies are better than price policies, and adjustment under capital flow is better than adjustment under capital control. The implications for China's trade surplus are analyzed.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhigang Huang, 2010. "Monetary policy and trade imbalance adjustment," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(3), pages 269-292.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jocebs:v:8:y:2010:i:3:p:269-292 DOI: 10.1080/14765284.2010.493641

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. McCallum, Bennett T. & Nelson, Edward, 1999. "Nominal income targeting in an open-economy optimizing model," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 553-578, June.
    2. Maurice Obstfeld & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2005. "Global Current Account Imbalances and Exchange Rate Adjustments," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 36(1), pages 67-146.
    3. Cooley, Thomas F & Hansen, Gary D, 1989. "The Inflation Tax in a Real Business Cycle Model," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(4), pages 733-748, September.
    4. Thomas F. Cooley & Gary D. Hansen, 1991. "The welfare costs of moderate inflations," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 483-518.
    5. Jeffrey C. Fuhrer, 2000. "Optimal monetary policy in a model with habit formation," Working Papers 00-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    6. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Charles L. Evans, 2005. "Nominal Rigidities and the Dynamic Effects of a Shock to Monetary Policy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 1-45, February.
    7. Calvo, Guillermo A., 1983. "Staggered prices in a utility-maximizing framework," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 383-398, September.
    8. Frank Smets & Raf Wouters, 2003. "An Estimated Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Model of the Euro Area," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(5), pages 1123-1175, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dai, Meixing, 2011. "Motivations and strategies for a real revaluation of the Yuan," MPRA Paper 30440, University Library of Munich, Germany.


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