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The impact of gender differences on determinants of job satisfaction among Chinese off-farm migrants in Jiangsu

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  • Russell Smyth
  • Qingguo Zhai
  • Xiaoxu Li

Abstract

This study examines the effect of own income versus reference group income and the subjective factors considered important in a job for a sample of off-farm migrants in China. We find that own income has a positive effect on job satisfaction while the effect of reference group income is gender specific. We find evidence that males experience a tunnelling effect (higher income co-workers increase their job satisfaction) while females experience a jealousy effect (higher income co-workers lower their job satisfaction). We explain this result in terms of men reacting more positively in competitive environments and that, in China, males have better prospects for promotion. We find that compared with employees in western countries, off-farm migrants in China place much more emphasis on income and less importance on collegiality and job stability.

Suggested Citation

  • Russell Smyth & Qingguo Zhai & Xiaoxu Li, 2009. "The impact of gender differences on determinants of job satisfaction among Chinese off-farm migrants in Jiangsu," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(3), pages 363-380.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jocebs:v:7:y:2009:i:3:p:363-380
    DOI: 10.1080/14765280903073256
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Maarten Bavinck & Richard Pollnac & Iris Monnereau & Pierre Failler, 2012. "Introduction to the Special Issue on Job Satisfaction in Fisheries in the Global South," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 109(1), pages 1-10, October.
    2. GAO, Wenshu & SMYTH, Russell, 2010. "Job satisfaction and relative income in economic transition: Status or signal?: The case of urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 442-455, September.
    3. repec:spr:jhappi:v:18:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s10902-016-9790-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Alexander Newman & Ingrid Nielsen & Russell Smyth & Angus Hooke, 2015. "Examining the Relationship Between Workplace Support and Life Satisfaction: The Mediating Role of Job Satisfaction," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 120(3), pages 769-781, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; migrants; job satisfaction;

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