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Defined contribution plan vs. defined benefits plan: reforming the legal retirement age

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  • Juan Lacomba
  • Francisco Lagos

Abstract

In the context of the current debate surrounding the reform of most social security systems, this paper analyzes the political economy of the legal retirement age. Using a life-cycle model, we study the effects of changing the redistributive parameters on the optimal legal retirement age in a Pay-As-You-Go social security system. Two pension plans are studied, with opposite results. In a defined contribution plan, an increase in the redistribution levels will delay the preferred legal retirement age. On the other hand, in a defined benefits plan, the same increase in the redistribution levels will lower this preferred age.

Suggested Citation

  • Juan Lacomba & Francisco Lagos, 2009. "Defined contribution plan vs. defined benefits plan: reforming the legal retirement age," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 1-11.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jecprf:v:12:y:2009:i:1:p:1-11 DOI: 10.1080/17487870802677668
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fethi Ogunc & Gokhan Yilmaz, 2000. "Estimating The Underground Economy In Turkey," Discussion Papers 0004, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
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    3. André Sapir, 2006. "Globalization and the Reform of European Social Models," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(2), pages 369-390, June.
    4. Pissarides, Christopher A. & Weber, Guglielmo, 1989. "An expenditure-based estimate of Britain's black economy," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 17-32, June.
    5. Dominik H. Enste & Friedrich Schneider, 2000. "Shadow Economies: Size, Causes, and Consequences," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(1), pages 77-114, March.
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