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Do Local Elites Capture Natural Disaster Reconstruction Funds?

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  • Yoshito Takasaki

Abstract

Using original survey data with rich, direct measures of local elites in rural Fiji, this article examines potential elite capture in the allocation of natural disaster reconstruction funds. Allocations of housing construction materials -- both receipt and amount received -- across villages, clans, and households are strongly targeted on cyclone damage, and local elites do not receive larger benefits over time. As the supply of reconstruction funds is limited during early periods, more severely affected victims do not receive benefits early, while clan leaders and elite clans do receive benefits early within villages.

Suggested Citation

  • Yoshito Takasaki, 2011. "Do Local Elites Capture Natural Disaster Reconstruction Funds?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(9), pages 1281-1298, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:47:y:2011:i:9:p:1281-1298
    DOI: 10.1080/00220388.2010.509786
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Samia Amin & Markus Goldstein, 2008. "Data Against Natural Disasters : Establishing Effective Systems for Relief, Recovery, and Reconstruction," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6511.
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    Cited by:

    1. Barrett, Sam, 2014. "Subnational Climate Justice? Adaptation Finance Distribution and Climate Vulnerability," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 130-142.
    2. Sawada, Yasuyuki & Takasaki, Yoshito, 2017. "Natural Disaster, Poverty, and Development: An Introduction," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 2-15.
    3. Yoshito Takasaki, 2011. "How is disaster aid allocated within poor villages?," Tsukuba Economics Working Papers 2011-004, Economics, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba.
    4. Takasaki, Yoshito, 2017. "Post-disaster Informal Risk Sharing Against Illness," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 64-74.
    5. Brata, Aloysius Gunadi, 2010. "Regional Development for a Disastrous Country," MPRA Paper 23606, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Takasaki, Yoshito, 2016. "Learning from disaster: community-based marine protected areas in Fiji," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(01), pages 53-77, February.
    7. Aloysius G. Brata & Piet Rietveld & Henri L.F. de Groot & Budy P. Resosudarmo & Wouter Zant, 2014. "Living with the Merapi Volcano: Risks and Disaster Microinsurance," Departmental Working Papers 2014-13, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
    8. Yoshito Takasaki, 2013. "Do natural disasters beget fraud victimization?: Unrealized coping through labor migration among the poor," Tsukuba Economics Working Papers 2013-002, Economics, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tsukuba.
    9. Ben D'Exelle & Marrit Berg, 2014. "Aid Distribution and Cooperation in Unequal Communities," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(1), pages 114-132, March.
    10. Takasaki, Yoshito, 2017. "Do Natural Disasters Decrease the Gender Gap in Schooling?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 75-89.
    11. Noy, Ilan, 2015. "Natural disasters and climate change in the Pacific island countries: New non-monetary measurements of impacts," Working Paper Series 4200, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    12. Ilan Noy, 2016. "Natural disasters in the Pacific Island Countries: new measurements of impacts," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 84(1), pages 7-18, November.
    13. Sam Barrett, 2015. "Subnational Adaptation Finance Allocation: Comparing Decentralized and Devolved Political Institutions in Kenya," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 15(3), pages 118-139, August.
    14. Sakai, Yoko & Estudillo, Jonna P. & Fuwa, Nobuhiko & Higuchi, Yuki & Sawada, Yasuyuki, 2017. "Do Natural Disasters Affect the Poor Disproportionately? Price Change and Welfare Impact in the Aftermath of Typhoon Milenyo in the Rural Philippines," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 16-26.

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