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Basic Research and International Spillovers


  • Mark Funk


This paper discriminates between basic and developmental research when estimating international research spillovers between nine OECD nations. Using panel cointegration techniques, the estimates show that basic research generates much larger international spillovers than developmental research. Developmental research in turn appears more easily appropriated by the research performer, and thus has a stronger effect domestically. These results suggest growth models should incorporate the firm's choice between basic and developmental research. More importantly, since basic research receives a large proportion of its funding from public sources, the finding of large international spillovers from basic research suggests current public research policies should be reevaluated. The results support the argument in favor of increased international coordination of basic research policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Funk, 2002. "Basic Research and International Spillovers," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 217-226.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:irapec:v:16:y:2002:i:2:p:217-226
    DOI: 10.1080/02692170110118911

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jaffe, Adam B, 1986. "Technological Opportunity and Spillovers of R&D: Evidence from Firms' Patents, Profits, and Market Value," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(5), pages 984-1001, December.
    2. Jorgenson, D.W., 1992. "Tax Reform and the Cost of Capital : An International Comparison," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1621, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    3. Keller, Wolfgang, 1998. "Are international R&D spillovers trade-related?: Analyzing spillovers among randomly matched trade partners," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(8), pages 1469-1481, September.
    4. Frank Lichtenberg & Bruno van Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, 1996. "International R&D Spillovers: A Re-Examination," NBER Working Papers 5668, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Im, Kyung So & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Shin, Yongcheol, 2003. "Testing for unit roots in heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 53-74, July.
    6. Maddala, G S & Wu, Shaowen, 1999. " A Comparative Study of Unit Root Tests with Panel Data and a New Simple Test," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(0), pages 631-652, Special I.
    7. Coe, David T & Helpman, Elhanan & Hoffmaister, Alexander W, 1997. "North-South R&D Spillovers," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(440), pages 134-149, January.
    8. Zvi Griliches, 1998. "Issues in Assessing the Contribution of Research and Development to Productivity Growth," NBER Chapters,in: R&D and Productivity: The Econometric Evidence, pages 17-45 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Zvi Griliches, 1998. "The Search for R&D Spillovers," NBER Chapters,in: R&D and Productivity: The Econometric Evidence, pages 251-268 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Michele Cincera & Bruno Van Pottelsberghe, 2001. "International R&D spillovers: a survey," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 169(169), pages 3-31.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carboni, Oliviero A., 2017. "The effect of public support on investment and R&D: An empirical evaluation on European manufacturing firms," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 282-295.
    2. Reiljan, Janno & Paltser, Ingra, 2013. "The implementation of research and development policy in European and Asian countries," Discourses in Social Market Economy 2013-03, OrdnungsPolitisches Portal (OPO).
    3. Hans Gersbach & Gerhard Sorger & Christian Amon, 2009. "Hierarchical Growth: Basic and Applied Research," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 09/118, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    4. Kleer, Robin, 2010. "Government R&D subsidies as a signal for private investors," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 1361-1374, December.
    5. Lacetera, Nicola & Zirulia, Lorenzo, 2012. "Individual preferences, organization, and competition in a model of R&D incentive provision," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 550-570.

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