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Effect of Historical Educational Level on Perceived Inequality, Preference for Redistribution and Progressive Taxation

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  • Eiji Yamamura

Abstract

This paper investigated the extent to which educational levels in the nineteenth century have shaped present-day norms, which influence the perceptions of present-day individuals, such as individuals’ perceived inequality, preference for redistribution, and progressive taxation. Cross-country, individual-level data were used to examine historical educational level and present-day perceptions of social and political issues. After controlling for various country-level and individual characteristics, the major findings were as follows: people in countries with higher educational levels in 1870 are less likely to support redistribution policies and progressive taxation. Moreover, people in countries with higher educational levels in 1870 are more likely to consider income inequality to be smaller.

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  • Eiji Yamamura, 2017. "Effect of Historical Educational Level on Perceived Inequality, Preference for Redistribution and Progressive Taxation," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(3), pages 355-369, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:intecj:v:31:y:2017:i:3:p:355-369
    DOI: 10.1080/10168737.2017.1330355
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. Andreea-Oana Iacobuță & Mihaela Ifrim, 2020. "Welfare Mentality as a Challenge to European Sustainable Development. What Role for Youth Inclusion and Institutions?," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(9), pages 1-25, April.
    3. Kuhn, Andreas, 2019. "The subversive nature of inequality: Subjective inequality perceptions and attitudes to social inequality," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 331-344.

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