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Moving Beyond the Masculine Neoclassical Classroom

  • Margaret Lewis
  • Kimmarie McGoldrick
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    In addition to critiques of the content and methodology of neoclassical economics, feminist economists have also offered constructive reflections on the way economics is taught. The "Voluntary Economics Content Standards for PreCollege Economics Education," developed in 1997 by the U.S. National Council of Economic Education, present yet another challenge to feminist economic educators. In this paper, we first review general methods for challenging and expanding these standards. Next, we select a specific content standard and explore how it might be reworked to reflect more accurately feminist economic scholarship and pedagogy. This reformulation of the standard will help broaden the pedagogy and content that are both implicit and explicit in all of the standards, allowing for a more inclusive classroom.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13545700110059252
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    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Feminist Economics.

    Volume (Year): 7 (2001)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 91-103

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:7:y:2001:i:2:p:91-103
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    1. Nelson, J.A., 1990. "Gender, Metaphor, And The Definition Of Economics," Papers 350, California Davis - Institute of Governmental Affairs.
    2. Susan Himmelweit, 1995. "The discovery of “unpaid work”: the social consequences of the expansion of “work”," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 1-19.
    3. Simon Duncan & Rosalind Edwards, 1997. "Lone Mothers and Paid Work - Rational Economic Man or Gendered Moral Rationalities?," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(2), pages 29-61.
    4. Susan Himmelweit, 1995. "The Discovery of 'Unpaid Work': the social consequences of the expansion of 'work'," Open Discussion Papers in Economics 6, The Open University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    5. Siegfried, John J & Meszaros, Bonnie T, 1997. "National Voluntary Content Standards for Pre-College Economics Education," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 247-53, May.
    6. Nancy Folbre, 1995. ""Holding hands at midnight": The paradox of caring labor," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 73-92.
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