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Gender, Metaphor, and the Definition of Economics


  • Nelson, Julie A.


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Suggested Citation

  • Nelson, Julie A., 1992. "Gender, Metaphor, and the Definition of Economics," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 8(01), pages 103-125, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:ecnphi:v:8:y:1992:i:01:p:103-125_00

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    Cited by:

    1. Wilfred Dolfsma, 2001. "Economists as subjects: Toward a psychology of economists," Forum for Social Economics, Springer;The Association for Social Economics, vol. 30(2), pages 77-88, March.
    2. Nancy Folbre & Julie A. Nelson, 2000. "For Love or Money--Or Both?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 123-140, Fall.
    3. Nelson, Julie A., 1997. "Feminism, ecology and the philosophy of economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 155-162, February.
    4. Iulie Aslaksen & Ane Flaatten & Charlotte Koren, 1999. "Introduction: Quality of Life Indicators," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2), pages 79-82.
    5. Julie Nelson, 2015. "Fearing fear: gender and economic discourse," Mind & Society: Cognitive Studies in Economics and Social Sciences, Springer;Fondazione Rosselli, vol. 14(1), pages 129-139, June.
    6. Nelson, Julie A., 2009. "Between a rock and a soft place: Ecological and feminist economics in policy debates," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 1-8, November.
    7. Julie Nelson, 1999. "Of Markets And Martyrs: Is It OK To Pay Well For Care?," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(3), pages 43-59.
    8. repec:dgr:rugsom:96c01 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Ailsa McKay, 2001. "Rethinking Work and Income Maintenance Policy: Promoting Gender Equality Through a Citizens' Basic Income," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 97-118.
    10. Anne Busch & Elke Holst, 2009. "Glass Ceiling Effect and Earnings: The Gender Pay Gap in Managerial Positions in Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 905, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    11. Zdravka, Todorova, 2009. "Employer of Last Resort Policy and Feminist Economics: Social Provisioning and Socialization of Investment," MPRA Paper 16240, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Julie A. Nelson, "undated". "09-07 "Getting Past "Rational Man/Emotional Woman": How Far Have Research Programs in Happiness and Interpersonal Relations Progressed?"," GDAE Working Papers 09-07, GDAE, Tufts University.
    13. Lourdes Beneria, 1999. "Globalization, Gender And The Davos Man," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(3), pages 61-83.
    14. Floro, Maria & Antonopoulos, Rania, 2004. "Asset Depletion Among the Poor: Does Gender Matter? The Case of Urban Households in Thailand," Vassar College Department of Economics Working Paper Series 59, Vassar College Department of Economics.
    15. Julie A. Nelson, "undated". "09-06 "Between a Rock and a Soft Place: Ecological and Feminist Economics in Policy Debates"," GDAE Working Papers 09-06, GDAE, Tufts University.
    16. Palsson, Gisli, 1998. "The virtual aquarium: Commodity fiction and cod fishing," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2-3), pages 275-288, February.
    17. Julie Nelson & Neva Goodwin, 2009. "Teaching Ecological and Feminist Economics in the Principles Course," Forum for Social Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(2-3), pages 173-187, January.
    18. Julie A. Nelson, "undated". "10-03 "The Relational Economy: A Buddhist and Feminist Analysis"," GDAE Working Papers 10-03, GDAE, Tufts University.
    19. Julie A. Nelson, 2012. "Are Women Really More Risk-Averse than Men?," GDAE Working Papers 12-05, GDAE, Tufts University.
    20. Eran Binenbaum, 2005. "The Power of the Provisioning Concept," School of Economics Working Papers 2005-09, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
    21. Margaret Lewis & Kimmarie McGoldrick, 2001. "Moving Beyond the Masculine Neoclassical Classroom," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(2), pages 91-103.
    22. Jochimsen, Maren & Knobloch, Ulrike, 1997. "Making the hidden visible: the importance of caring activities and their principles for any economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 107-112, February.
    23. Julie A. Nelson, "undated". "09-04 "Sociology, Economics, and Gender: Can Knowledge of the Past Contribute to a Better Future?"," GDAE Working Papers 09-04, GDAE, Tufts University.

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