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Impacts of playing after school on academic performance: a propensity score matching approach

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  • Yajuan Li
  • Marco A. Palma
  • Zhicheng Phil Xu

Abstract

We present a plausible causal analysis of the impact of playing after school on academic performance and investigate parental support as a potential channel. We exploit the data from the 2011 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Survey to evaluate the effects by using a propensity score matching approach. The results show that playing after school increases math and science scores of fourth grade students. We find that White students benefit from playing after school, but non-White students do not. Furthermore, we present evidence that parental support enhances the effects of playing after school.

Suggested Citation

  • Yajuan Li & Marco A. Palma & Zhicheng Phil Xu, 2017. "Impacts of playing after school on academic performance: a propensity score matching approach," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(6), pages 575-589, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:25:y:2017:i:6:p:575-589
    DOI: 10.1080/09645292.2017.1311301
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lipscomb, Stephen, 2007. "Secondary school extracurricular involvement and academic achievement: a fixed effects approach," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 463-472, August.
    2. James J. Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Petra E. Todd, 1997. "Matching As An Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(4), pages 605-654.
    3. Guido W. Imbens, 2015. "Matching Methods in Practice: Three Examples," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 50(2), pages 373-419.
    4. Pfeifer, Christian & Corneli├čen, Thomas, 2010. "The impact of participation in sports on educational attainment--New evidence from Germany," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 94-103, February.
    5. Lechner, Michael, 1999. "Earnings and Employment Effects of Continuous Off-the-Job Training in East Germany after Unification," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 17(1), pages 74-90, January.
    6. John M. Barron & Bradley T. Ewing & Glen R. Waddell, 2000. "The Effects Of High School Athletic Participation On Education And Labor Market Outcomes," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(3), pages 409-421, August.
    7. Rees, Daniel I. & Sabia, Joseph J., 2010. "Sports participation and academic performance: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 751-759, October.
    8. Eide, Eric R. & Ronan, Nick, 2001. "Is participation in high school athletics an investment or a consumption good?: Evidence from high school and beyond," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 431-442, October.
    9. James J. Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Petra Todd, 1998. "Matching As An Econometric Evaluation Estimator," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 261-294.
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    Cited by:

    1. Geraint Johnes, 2018. "A sporting chance: on the impact of sports participation on subsequent earnings," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 38(1), pages 146-151.

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