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Projection of input-output tables by means of mathematical programming based on the hypothesis of stable structural evolution


  • Miguel Angel Tarancon
  • Pablo Del Rio


The high costs involved in the construction of input-output tables (IOTs) using survey methods, makes the development of mathematical projection techniques attractive. An adjustment and projection method of IOTs, based on mathematical programming techniques, is proposed here. The flexibility and ability to include information on elements and aggregates is one of this method's main advantages over alternative adjustment methods. Among the information included in the adjustment, the most relevant is related to the evolution hypothesis of the production structure under stable conditions. This leads to the inclusion of intervals for coefficients. A set of adjusted tables, consistent with their own internal structure, is obtained after an interactive and iterative process that reconciles all information sources. A projection of IOTs in Spain for the period 1995-1998 is undertaken to examine the accuracy of the method.

Suggested Citation

  • Miguel Angel Tarancon & Pablo Del Rio, 2005. "Projection of input-output tables by means of mathematical programming based on the hypothesis of stable structural evolution," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 1-23.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:17:y:2005:i:1:p:1-23 DOI: 10.1080/09535310500034119

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. C. Antonelli, 2007. "Localized Technological Change," Chapters,in: Elgar Companion to Neo-Schumpeterian Economics, chapter 16 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Michael Lahr & Louis de Mesnard, 2004. "Biproportional Techniques in Input-Output Analysis: Table Updating and Structural Analysis," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 115-134.
    3. G. Dosi, 1999. "Innovation, Organization and Economic Dynamics. An Autobiographical Introduction," LEM Papers Series 1999/17, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    4. Kurt Kratena & Gerold Zakarias, 2004. "Input Coefficient Change Using Biproportional Econometric Adjustment Functions," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 191-203.
    5. Yasuhide Okuyama & Geoffrey J.D. Hewings & Michael Sonis & Philip R. Israilevich, 2002. "An Economic Analysis of Biproportional Properties in an Input-Output System," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(2), pages 361-387.
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    Cited by:

    1. Wood, Richard & Garnett, Stephen, 2009. "An assessment of environmental sustainability in Northern Australia using the ecological footprint and with reference to Indigenous populations and remoteness," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(5), pages 1375-1384, March.
    2. Tarancon, Miguel Angel & del Rio, Pablo, 2007. "CO2 emissions and intersectoral linkages. The case of Spain," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 1100-1116, February.


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