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General Equilibrium Analysis of International TFP Growth Rates


  • Victoria Shestalova


The paper presents a study of the total factor productivity (TFP) performance among developed countries between 1985 and 1990. The analysis includes the three large economies: the US, Japan and Europe. A general equilibrium model of these economies is used to estimate TFP growth at the sectoral and at the aggregate levels. The model is based on the fundamentals of the economies and employs only data on input-output flows, factor inputs across sectors, consumption and trade patterns and endowments. Prices are endogenous in the model. They are obtained as shadow prices from the model's linear program and then used to measure TFP growth and decompose it in a technical change effect, a demand effect and a terms-of-trade effect. The technical change effect is highly correlated with the conventional Solow residual measure. This result lends support to the standard measure of technological change.

Suggested Citation

  • Victoria Shestalova, 2001. "General Equilibrium Analysis of International TFP Growth Rates," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(4), pages 391-404.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:ecsysr:v:13:y:2001:i:4:p:391-404 DOI: 10.1080/09535310120089770

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. D. W. Jorgenson & Z. Griliches, 1967. "The Explanation of Productivity Change," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(3), pages 249-283.
    2. Thijs ten Raa & Pierre Mohnen, 2009. "The Location of Comparative Advantages on the Basis of Fundamentals Only," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Input–Output Economics: Theory And Applications Featuring Asian Economies, chapter 23, pages 425-446 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    3. Martin L. Weitzman, 1976. "On the Welfare Significance of National Product in a Dynamic Economy," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 90(1), pages 156-162.
    4. Erik Dietzenbacher & Bart Los, 1998. "Structural Decomposition Techniques: Sense and Sensitivity," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(4), pages 307-324.
    5. Raa, Thijs ten & Wolff, Edward N., 1991. "Secondary products and the measurement of productivity growth," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 581-615, December.
    6. Pirkko Aulin-Ahmavaara, 1999. "Effective Rates of Sectoral Productivity Change," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(4), pages 349-363.
    7. Ten Raa, T. & Mohnen, P., 1998. "Sources of productivity growth : Technology, terms of trade and preference shifts," Discussion Paper 1998-105, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    8. Wolff, Edward N., 1994. "Productivity measurement within an input-output framework," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 75-92, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thijs Raa & Victoria Shestalova, 2011. "The Solow residual, Domar aggregation, and inefficiency: a synthesis of TFP measures," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 71-77, August.
    2. Ten Raa, T. & Shestalova, V., 2006. "Alternative Measures of Total Factor Productivity Growth," Discussion Paper 2006-54, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    3. Prieto, Angel M. & Zofio, Jose L., 2007. "Network DEA efficiency in input-output models: With an application to OECD countries," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 178(1), pages 292-304, April.


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