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Exports, technical progress and productivity growth in a transition economy: a non-parametric approach for China

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  • Xiaolan Fu

Abstract

Theories suggesting either static or dynamic productivity gains derived from exports often assume the prior existence of a competitive market. In the presence of market imperfection and distortion, however, the competition and resource reallocation effects of exports on productive efficiency may be greatly reduced; and there may actually be disincentives for innovation. This paper analyses the impact of exports on aggregate productivity growth in a transition economy using a panel of Chinese manufacturing industries over the period 1990-1997. TFP growth is estimated by employing a non-parametric approach and is decomposed into technical progress and efficiency change. No evidence has been found suggesting significant productivity gains at the industry level resulting from exports. Findings of the current study suggest that, for exports to generate significant positive effect on TFP growth, a well-developed domestic market and a neutral, outward-oriented policy are necessary.

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  • Xiaolan Fu, 2005. "Exports, technical progress and productivity growth in a transition economy: a non-parametric approach for China," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(7), pages 725-739.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:37:y:2005:i:7:p:725-739
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840500049041
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kui-Wai Li & Tung Liu & Lihong Yun, 2007. "Technology Progress, Efficiency, and Scale of Economy in Post-reform China," Working Papers 200701, Ball State University, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2007.
    2. BAAK, SaangJoon, 2008. "The bilateral real exchange rates and trade between China and the U.S," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 117-127, June.
    3. Henderson, Daniel J. & Tochkov, Kiril & Badunenko, Oleg, 2007. "A drive up the capital coast? Contributions to post-reform growth across Chinese provinces," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 569-594, September.
    4. Li, Kui-Wai & Liu, Tung, 2011. "Economic and productivity growth decomposition: An application to post-reform China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1-2), pages 366-373, January.
    5. Faria, João Ricardo & Mollick, André Varella & Albuquerque, Pedro H. & León-Ledesma, Miguel A., 2009. "The effect of oil price on China's exports," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 793-805, December.
    6. Emilio Galdeano-Gómez, 2010. "Exporting and Environmental Performance: A Firm-level Productivity Analysis," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(1), pages 60-88, January.
    7. Azza El-Shinnawy, 2010. "Trends of Total Factor Productivity in Egypt’s Pharmaceutical Industry: Evidence from the Nonparametric Malmquist Index Approach," Working Papers 524, Economic Research Forum, revised 05 Jan 2010.
    8. Oluremi Ogun, 2015. "A Fundamental-based Approach to Productivity Growth," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 43(3), pages 383-392, September.
    9. Maria Jesus Herrerias & Vicente Orts, 2011. "The driving forces behind China’s growth," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 19(1), pages 79-124, January.
    10. Zhou, Xianbo & Li, Kui-Wai & Li, Qin, 2011. "An analysis on technical efficiency in post-reform China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 357-372, September.
    11. Harrison, Ann & Rodríguez-Clare, Andrés, 2010. "Trade, Foreign Investment, and Industrial Policy for Developing Countries," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
    12. Yaojun Yao, 2011. "International trade and technological progress in china: Evidence from time series," Frontiers of Economics in China, Springer;Higher Education Press, vol. 6(3), pages 464-478, September.
    13. Watanabe, Michio & Tanaka, Katsuya, 2007. "Efficiency analysis of Chinese industry: A directional distance function approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(12), pages 6323-6331, December.
    14. Joao Ricardo Faria & Andre Varella Mollick & Pedro H. Albuquerque & Miguel Leon-Ledesma, 2008. "China's Exports and the Oil Price," Studies in Economics 0812, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    15. Kui-Wai Li & Tung Liu & Lihong Yun, 2008. "Decomposition of Economic and Productivity Growth in Post-reform China," Working Papers 200806, Ball State University, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2008.
    16. Vu, Van Huong, 2012. "Higher productivity in Exporters: self-selection, learning by exporting or both? Evidence from Vietnamese manufacturing SMEs," MPRA Paper 40708, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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