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Knowledge Transfer, Entrepreneurship and Economic Growth: Some Reflections and Implications for Policy in the Netherlands

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  • Alan Hughes

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of the relationship between entrepreneurship university spin-off activity and economic growth. It suggests the need for a diversified university structure, and that spin-offs are a misleading measure of the most important activity for technology transfer which remains the training and education of highly qualified scientists and technologists. It argues that a linear approach to the innovation process positioning basic science at one end of a chain and commercialization at the other is misleading. The reality is more complex and incorporates important areas of activity where consideration of use and the pursuit of basic science go hand in hand.

Suggested Citation

  • Alan Hughes, 2003. "Knowledge Transfer, Entrepreneurship and Economic Growth: Some Reflections and Implications for Policy in the Netherlands," Working Papers wp273, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cbr:cbrwps:wp273 Note: PRO-1
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    File URL: https://www.cbr.cam.ac.uk/fileadmin/user_upload/centre-for-business-research/downloads/working-papers/wp273.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Audretsch, David B & Lehmann, Erik E & Warning, Susanne, 2003. "University Spillovers: Strategic Location and New Firm Performance," CEPR Discussion Papers 3837, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andy Cosh & Xiaolan Fu & Alan Hughes, 2005. "Management characteristics, collaboration and innovative efficiency: evidence from UK survey data," Working Papers wp311, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    2. Edwin Garces & Tugrul Daim, 2012. "Impact of Renewable Energy Technology on the Economic Growth of the USA," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), pages 233-249.
    3. Ajit Singh, 2004. "Labour Standards and the 'Race to the Bottom': Rethinking Globalization and Workers' Rights from Developmental and Solidaristic Perspectives," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, pages 85-104.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    University spin-offs; Technology Transfer; Entrepreneurship; Productivity; Economic Growth;

    JEL classification:

    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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