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Collaboration and firm size: some evidence from the UK defence industry

  • Paul Bishop
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    This paper presents evidence on the relationship between collaboration and firm size derived from an empirical study of the UK defence industry. The results indicate that size has a positive impact on collaboration and, in particular, with the propensity to collaborate with overseas firms. However, size has no impact on the propensity to collaborate with UK partners. This lends support to theories which emphasize the resource constraints facing small firms in developing international collaboration. There is a need for a policy debate concerning mechanisms to promote collaboration to assist small firms to realise the benefits of international collaboration.

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    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0003684032000158073
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    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

    Volume (Year): 35 (2003)
    Issue (Month): 18 ()
    Pages: 1965-1969

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    Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:35:y:2003:i:18:p:1965-1969
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    1. Keith W. Glaister, 1996. "Strategic Motives For International Alliance Formation," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(3), pages 301-332, 05.
    2. JS Armstrong & Terry Overton, 2005. "Estimating Nonresponse Bias in Mail Surveys," General Economics and Teaching 0502044, EconWPA.
    3. Bennett Harrison, 2007. "Industrial Districts: Old Wine in New Bottles? (Volume 26, Number 5, 1992)," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(sup1), pages S107-S121.
    4. Tomokazu Arita & Philip McCann, 2000. "Industrial alliances and firm location behaviour: some evidence from the US semiconductor industry," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(11), pages 1391-1403.
    5. Oughton, Christine & Whittam, Geoff, 1997. "Competition and Cooperation in the Small Firm Sector," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 44(1), pages 1-30, February.
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