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Health-impaired employees' job satisfaction: new evidence from Athens, Greece

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  • Nick Drydakis

Abstract

This study by utilizing the 2008 Athens Area Study (AAS) data set investigates four aspects of job satisfaction -- total pay, promotion prospects, respect received from one's supervisor and total job satisfaction -- between healthy and heath-impaired employees. Health-impaired employees are found to be less satisfied according to all job satisfaction measures even when a large number of productivity features and job characteristics are controlled for. The outcomes also suggest that women are more satisfied with their jobs than men are, regardless of health status. Moreover, the estimations show that health-impaired employees' job satisfaction is affected more than healthy employees' job satisfaction by adverse mental health symptoms (life dissatisfaction). Finally, health-impaired employees are found to become more satisfied with their jobs with time after disability onset. This study concludes that health-impaired employees may have higher expectations about what they will obtain from their work, as well as they may have job satisfaction adjustments.

Suggested Citation

  • Nick Drydakis, 2012. "Health-impaired employees' job satisfaction: new evidence from Athens, Greece," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(8), pages 789-793, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:19:y:2012:i:8:p:789-793
    DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2011.605346
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Saziye Gazioglu & Aysit Tansel, 2006. "Job satisfaction in Britain: individual and job related factors," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(10), pages 1163-1171.
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    3. A. Sousa-Poza & A. A. Sousa-Poza, 2003. "Gender differences in job satisfaction in Great Britain, 1991-2000: permanent or transitory?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(11), pages 691-694.
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    5. Rivers, Douglas & Vuong, Quang H., 1988. "Limited information estimators and exogeneity tests for simultaneous probit models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 347-366, November.
    6. Nick Drydakis, 2010. "Health impairments and labour market outcomes," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 11(5), pages 457-469, October.
    7. Green, Francis, 2010. "Well-being, job satisfaction and labour mobility," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(6), pages 897-903, December.
    8. Clark, Andrew E., 1997. "Job satisfaction and gender: Why are women so happy at work?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 341-372, December.
    9. Richard E. Lucas & Andrew Clark & Yannis Georgellis & Ed Diener, 2002. "Re-Examining Adaptation and the Setpoint Model of Happiness: Reactions to Changes in Marital Status," DELTA Working Papers 2002-08, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Barnay, 2016. "Health, work and working conditions: a review of the European economic literature," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(6), pages 693-709, July.
    2. Thomas Barnay & Emmanuel Duguet & Christine Le Clainche & Mathieu Narcy & Yann Videau, 2014. "L’impact du handicap sur les trajectoires d’emploi : une comparaison public-privé," Working Papers hal-01076896, HAL.
    3. Aysit Tansel & Saziye Gazîoglu, 2014. "Management-employee relations, firm size and job satisfaction," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 35(8), pages 1260-1275, October.
    4. Drydakis, Nick, 2012. "Men's Sexual Orientation and Job Satisfaction," IZA Discussion Papers 6272, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy

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