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Political institutions and central bank independence revisited

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  • B. Pistoresi
  • F. Salsano
  • D. Ferrari

Abstract

We build on earlier studies regarding Central Bank Independence (CBI) by relating it to political, institutional and economic variables. The data suggest that CBI is positively related to the presence of federalism, the features of the electoral system and parties, the correlation between the shocks to the level of economic activity in the countries included in the sample and, for a sub-sample of economies, the convergence criteria to join the European Monetary Union (EMU).

Suggested Citation

  • B. Pistoresi & F. Salsano & D. Ferrari, 2011. "Political institutions and central bank independence revisited," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(7), pages 679-682.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:18:y:2011:i:7:p:679-682
    DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2010.485923
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kenneth Rogoff, 1985. "The Optimal Degree of Commitment to an Intermediate Monetary Target," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 100(4), pages 1169-1189.
    2. Moser, Peter, 1999. "Checks and balances, and the supply of central bank independence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(8), pages 1569-1593, August.
    3. Alex Cukierman, 1992. "Central Bank Strategy, Credibility, and Independence: Theory and Evidence," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262031981.
    4. Farvaque, Etienne, 2002. "Political determinants of central bank independence," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 131-135, September.
    5. D'Amato, Marcello & Martina, Riccardo, 2005. "Credibility and commitment of monetary policy in open economies," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 872-902, December.
    6. Adam S. Posen, 1995. "Declarations Are Not Enough: Financial Sector Sources of Central Bank Independence," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1995, Volume 10, pages 253-274, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. de Haan, J. & Eijffinger, Sylvester, 2016. "The Politics of Central Bank Independence," Discussion Paper 2016-047, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    2. Barbara Pistoresi & Maddalena Cavicchioli & Giulio Brevini, 2017. "Central Bank Independence, financial instability and politics: new evidence for OECD and non-OECD countries," Department of Economics 0112, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    3. Ana Carolina Garriga, 2016. "Central Bank Independence in the World: A New Data Set," International Interactions, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(5), pages 849-868, October.
    4. Ning Xu & Jian Hong & Timothy C. G. Fisher, 2016. "Model selection consistency from the perspective of generalization ability and VC theory with an application to Lasso," Papers 1606.00142, arXiv.org.
    5. repec:ibn:ijefaa:v:9:y:2017:i:7:p:179-188 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Barbara Pistoresi & Maddalena Cavicchioli & Giulio Brevini, 2017. "Central Bank Independence, financial instability and politics: new evidence for OECD and non-OECD countries," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 129, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit

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