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Cigarette demand in Canada and the US-Canadian cigarette smuggling


  • Rajeev Goel


Using annual data from Canadian provinces, this paper studies the effects of a drastic reduction in Canadian cigarette taxes in 1994 on cross-border smuggling. The results show that the policy was successful in that the border prices seem to not have had a statistically significant impact on cigarette sales. The own price elasticity of cigarette demand in Canada is estimated to be around -0.7. The elasticity is slightly lower when the border-price effects are taken into account and is larger than the corresponding estimates for the USA, implying that dollar-for-dollar there might be greater opportunities for reducing smoking in Canada through higher taxes than the USA.

Suggested Citation

  • Rajeev Goel, 2004. "Cigarette demand in Canada and the US-Canadian cigarette smuggling," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(9), pages 537-540.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:11:y:2004:i:9:p:537-540 DOI: 10.1080/1350485042000263043

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Kellie Curry Raper & Maria Namakhoye Wanzala & Rodolfo Nayga, 2002. "Food expenditures and household demographic composition in the US: a demand systems approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(8), pages 981-992.
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    9. John L. Park & Rodney B. Holcomb & Kellie Curry Raper & Oral Capps, 1996. "A Demand Systems Analysis of Food Commodities by U.S. Households Segmented by Income," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(2), pages 290-300.
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    Cited by:

    1. Auld M. Christopher & Zarrabi Mahmood, 2015. "Long-Term Effects of Tobacco Prices Faced by Adolescents," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 18(1), pages 1-24, January.
    2. Ferrier, Peyton Michael, 2008. "Illicit Agricultural Trade," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 37(2), October.
    3. Goel, Rajeev K. & Nelson, Michael A., 2007. "The Master Settlement Agreement and cigarette tax policy," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 431-438.
    4. Rajeev Goel & Michael Nelson, 2012. "Cigarette demand and effectiveness of U.S. smoking control policies: state-level evidence for more than half a century," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(3), pages 1079-1095, June.
    5. Junmin Wan, 2004. "Cigarette Tax Revenues and Tobacco Control in Japan," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 04-11-Rev, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), revised Feb 2006.

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