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The importance of technology-based intersectoral linkages for market share dynamics

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  • Keld Laursen
  • Valentina Meliciani

Abstract

This paper introduces inter-sectoral technology-based linkages (or technological spillovers) in a empirical model of international market share dynamics. The Pavitt taxonomy is applied as a yardstick for interpreting the empirical results. In accordance with the criteria behind the taxonomy, we find upstream linkages to be more important for the determination of market shares in scale intensive and supplier dominated sectors, while downstream linkages are particularly important for specialised suppliers. We also find investment to be more important for scale intensive types of sectors, formal R&D for science based sectors, and costs for supplier dominated sectors. The results highlight that the relative importance of different sources of competitiveness differs across sectors and thus reconcile the differences in emphasis in relation to the role of technology in determining trade flows, between (a) a tradition that stresses the importance of knowledge developed in a particular sector, and (b) the so-called ‘home market hypothesis’, that points out how inter-sectoral linkages within a particular country determine trade flows from that country.
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  • Keld Laursen & Valentina Meliciani, 2000. "The importance of technology-based intersectoral linkages for market share dynamics," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 136(4), pages 702-723, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:weltar:v:136:y:2000:i:4:p:702-723
    DOI: 10.1007/BF02707649
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carlin, Wendy & Glyn, Andrew & Van Reenen, John, 2001. "Export Market Performance of OECD Countries: An Empirical Examination of the Role of Cost Competitiveness," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(468), pages 128-162, January.
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    4. Pavitt, Keith, 1984. "Sectoral patterns of technical change: Towards a taxonomy and a theory," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 13(6), pages 343-373, December.
    5. Laursen, Keld, 1996. "Horizontal diversification in the Danish national system of innovation: the case of pharmaceuticals," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(7), pages 1121-1137, October.
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    7. Keld Laursen & Ina Drejer, 1999. "Do Inter-Sectoral Linkages Matter for International Export Specialisation?," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(4), pages 311-330.
    8. Bart Verspagen & Katharine Wakelin, 1997. "Trade and Technology from a Schumpeterian Perspective," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 181-194.
    9. Nicolai J. Foss, 1996. "Firms, Incomplete Contracts and Organizational Learning," DRUID Working Papers 96-2, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
    10. Greenhalgh, Christine & Taylor, Paul & Wilson, Rob, 1994. "Innovation and Export Volumes and Prices--A Disaggregated Study," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(1), pages 102-135, January.
    11. M. V. Posner, 1961. "International Trade And Technical Change," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(3), pages 323-341.
    12. Antoine Magnier & Joël Toujas-Bernate, 1994. "Technology and trade: Empirical evidences for the major five industrialized countries," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 130(3), pages 494-520, September.
    13. Peter Maskell, 1996. "Localised Low-tech Learning in the Furniture Industry," DRUID Working Papers 96-11, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
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    15. Giovanni Amendola & Giovanni Dosi & Erasmo Papagni, 1993. "The dynamics of international competitiveness," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 129(3), pages 451-471, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Bogliacino & Mario Pianta, 2016. "The Pavitt Taxonomy, revisited: patterns of innovation in manufacturing and services," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 33(2), pages 153-180, August.
    2. Castellacci, Fulvio, 2008. "Technological paradigms, regimes and trajectories: Manufacturing and service industries in a new taxonomy of sectoral patterns of innovation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(6-7), pages 978-994, July.
    3. Keld Laursen & Ammon Salter, 2005. "The fruits of intellectual production: economic and scientific specialisation among OECD countries," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(2), pages 289-308, March.
    4. Fulvio Castellacci, 2007. "Technological regimes and sectoral differences in productivity growth ," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(6), pages 1105-1145, December.
    5. Amable, Bruno & Ledezma, Ivan & Robin, Stéphane, 2016. "Product market regulation, innovation, and productivity," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(10), pages 2087-2104.
    6. Montobbio, Fabio & Rampa, Francesco, 2005. "The impact of technology and structural change on export performance in nine developing countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 527-547, April.
    7. Castellacci, Fulvio, 2006. "The interactions between national systems and sectoral patterns of innovation: a cross-country analysis of Pavitt’s taxonomy," MPRA Paper 27601, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Laursen, Keld & Meliciani, Valentina, 2010. "The role of ICT knowledge flows for international market share dynamics," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 687-697, June.
    9. LEE, Keun & CHOO, Kineung & Yoon, Minho, 2013. "Comparing the Productivity Impacts of Knowledge Spillovers from Network and Arm’s Length Industries:Findings from Business Groups in Korea," IIR Working Paper 13-15, Institute of Innovation Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    10. Guerrieri, Paolo & Meliciani, Valentina, 2005. "Technology and international competitiveness: The interdependence between manufacturing and producer services," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 489-502, December.
    11. Castellacci, Fulvio, 2008. "Innovation and the competitiveness of industries: comparing the mainstream and the evolutionary approaches," MPRA Paper 27523, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. repec:got:cegedp:102 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Rinaldo Evangelista & Matteo Lucchese & Valentina Meliciani, 2013. "The contribution of Business services to the export performances of manufacturing industries. An empirical study on 5 European countries," Working Papers 14, Birkbeck Centre for Innovation Management Research, revised Nov 2013.
    14. de Jong, Jeroen P.J. & Marsili, Orietta, 2006. "The fruit flies of innovations: A taxonomy of innovative small firms," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 213-229, March.
    15. Gehringer, Agnieszka, 2010. "Pecuniary knowledge externalities in a new taxonomy: Knowledge interactions in a vertically integrated system," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 102, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    16. Yvonne Wolfmayr, 2008. "Producer Services and Competitiveness of Manufacturing Exports," FIW Research Reports series I-009, FIW.
    17. Muscio, Alessandro & Nardone, Gianluca & Stasi, Antonio, 2012. "Perceived Technological Regimes: An Empirical Analysis of the Apulian Wine Industry," 2012 International European Forum, February 13-17, 2012, Innsbruck-Igls, Austria 144969, International European Forum on Innovation and System Dynamics in Food Networks.
    18. Meliciani, Valentina, 2002. "The impact of technological specialisation on national performance in a balance-of-payments-constrained growth model," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 101-118, March.
    19. Dosi, Giovanni & Grazzi, Marco & Moschella, Daniele, 2015. "Technology and costs in international competitiveness: From countries and sectors to firms," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(10), pages 1795-1814.
    20. Valentina Meliciani, 2010. "Exports of Knowledge-intensive Services and Manufactures: The Role of ICTs and Intersectoral Linkages," Chapters,in: The Shape of the Division of Labour, chapter 4 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    21. Piscitello, Lucia, 2000. "Relatedness and coherence in technological and product diversification of the world's largest firms," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 295-315, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    C33; F14; O31;

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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