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Work Satisfaction of Chinese Employees: A Social Exchange and Gender-Based View

Author

Listed:
  • Hang Ngo

    ()

  • Sharon Foley
  • Ming Ji
  • Raymond Loi

Abstract

This study examines how perceptions of the work context affect the job and career satisfaction of Chinese employees. Perceived organizational support (POS), procedural justice, and gender bias against women are considered as antecedents. Gender is expected to moderate the relationships between these antecedents and the outcome variables. The results of hierarchical regression analysis on data from 591 Chinese employees indicated that POS and procedural justice are positively related to employees’ job and career satisfaction. Additionally, gender acts as a moderator in the relationship between POS and job satisfaction, and between gender bias against women and career satisfaction. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Hang Ngo & Sharon Foley & Ming Ji & Raymond Loi, 2014. "Work Satisfaction of Chinese Employees: A Social Exchange and Gender-Based View," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 116(2), pages 457-473, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:116:y:2014:i:2:p:457-473
    DOI: 10.1007/s11205-013-0290-2
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11205-013-0290-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kwok Leung & Peter B Smith & Zhongming Wang & Haifa Sun, 1996. "Job Satisfaction in Joint Venture Hotels in China: An Organizational Justice Analysis," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 27(4), pages 947-962, December.
    2. Raymond Loi & Hang-Yue Ngo, 2010. "Mobility norms, risk aversion, and career satisfaction of Chinese employees," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 237-255, June.
    3. Kwok Leung & Peter B Smith & Zhongming Wang & Haifa Sun, 1996. "Job Satisfaction in Joint Venture Hotels in China: An Organizational Justice Analysis," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 27(5), pages 947-962, December.
    4. Richardsen, Astrid M. & Mikkelsen, Aslaug & Burke, Ronald J., 1997. "Work experiences and career and job satisfaction among professional and managerial women in Norway," Scandinavian Journal of Management, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 209-218, June.
    5. Peng, Kelly Z. & Ngo, Hang-Yue & Shi, Junqi & Wong, Chi-Sum, 2009. "Gender differences in the work commitment of Chinese workers: An investigation of two alternative explanations," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 323-335, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yunxia Zhu & Alison M. Konrad & Hao Jiao, 2016. "Violation and activation of gender expectations: Do Chinese managerial women face a narrow band of acceptable career guanxi strategies?," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 53-86, March.
    2. Chiara Rollero & Angela Fedi & Norma Piccoli, 2016. "Gender or Occupational Status: What Counts More for Well-Being at Work?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(2), pages 467-480, September.
    3. Ye Luo, 2016. "Gender and Job Satisfaction in Urban China: The Role of Individual, Family, and Job Characteristics," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 125(1), pages 289-309, January.
    4. repec:spr:soinre:v:132:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-015-1153-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Nie, Peng & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso, 2017. "What Chinese Workers Value: An Analysis of Job Satisfaction, Job Expectations, and Labor Turnover in China," IZA Discussion Papers 10963, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Ye Luo, 2016. "Gender and Job Satisfaction in Urban China: The Role of Individual, Family, and Job Characteristics," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 125(1), pages 289-309, January.

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