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On measuring scholarly influence by citations

Author

Listed:
  • Martin Ravallion

    () (World Bank)

  • Adam Wagstaff

    () (World Bank)

Abstract

Abstract Bibliometric measures based on citations are widely used in assessing the scientific publication records of authors, institutions and journals. Yet currently favored measures lack a clear theoretical foundation and are known to have counter-intuitive properties. The paper proposes a new approach that is grounded on a theoretical “influence function,” representing explicit prior beliefs about how citations reflect influence. Conditions are derived for robust qualitative comparisons of influence—conditions that can be implemented using readily-available data. Two examples are provided, one using the world’s top-10 economics department, the other using the top-10 economics journals.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Ravallion & Adam Wagstaff, 2011. "On measuring scholarly influence by citations," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 88(1), pages 321-337, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:scient:v:88:y:2011:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-011-0375-0
    DOI: 10.1007/s11192-011-0375-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David L. Anderson & John Tressler, 2013. "The Relevance of the “h-” and “g-” Index to Economics in the Context of A Nation-Wide Research Evaluation Scheme: The New Zealand Case," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 32(1), pages 81-94, March.
    2. Giovanni Abramo & Ciriaco Andrea D’Angelo & Fulvio Viel, 2013. "The suitability of h and g indexes for measuring the research performance of institutions," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 97(3), pages 555-570, December.
    3. Neus Herranz & Javier Ruiz-Castillo, 2013. "The end of the “European Paradox”," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 95(1), pages 453-464, April.
    4. Antonio Abatemarco & Roberto Dell’Anno, 2013. "Certainty equivalent citation: generalized classes of citation indexes," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 94(1), pages 263-271, January.
    5. Aurora A. C. Teixeira, 2011. "Mapping the (in)visible college(s) in the field of entrepreneurship," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 89(1), pages 1-36, October.
    6. David Anderson & John Tressler, 2018. "The Impact of Citation Timing: A Framework and Examples," Review of Economics and Institutions, Università di Perugia, vol. 9(2).

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