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Are scientific memes inherited differently from gendered authorship?

Author

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  • Tanya Araújo

    (Universidade de Lisboa
    REM Research in Economics and Mathematics, UECE Research Unit on Complexity and Economics)

  • Elsa Fontainha

    (Universidade de Lisboa
    CEsA GSG Research in Social Sciences and Management)

Abstract

This paper seeks to build upon the previous literature on gender aspects in research collaboration and knowledge diffusion. Our approach adds the meme inheritance notion to traditional citation analysis, as we investigate if scientific memes are inherited differently from gendered authorship. Since authors of scientific papers inherit knowledge from their cited authors, once authorship is gendered we are able to characterize the inheritance process with respect to the frequencies of memes and their propagation scores depending on the gender of the authors. By applying methods that enable the gender disambiguation of authors, missing data on the gender of citing and cited authors is dealt with. Our empirically based approach allows for investigating the combined effect of meme inheritance and gendered transmission. Results show that scientific memes do not spread differently from either male or female cited authors. Likewise, the memes that we analyse were not found to propagate more easily via male or female inheritance.

Suggested Citation

  • Tanya Araújo & Elsa Fontainha, 2018. "Are scientific memes inherited differently from gendered authorship?," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 117(2), pages 953-972, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:scient:v:117:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s11192-018-2903-7
    DOI: 10.1007/s11192-018-2903-7
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Memes; Knowledge diffusion; Gender; Bibliometrics; Research collaboration;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights
    • C55 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Large Data Sets: Modeling and Analysis
    • C89 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Other

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