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Risk as an Attribute in Discrete Choice Experiments: A Systematic Review of the Literature

Author

Listed:
  • Mark Harrison

    ()

  • Dan Rigby

    ()

  • Caroline Vass

    ()

  • Terry Flynn

    ()

  • Jordan Louviere

    ()

  • Katherine Payne

    ()

Abstract

Improvements in reporting and transparency of risk presentation from conception to the analysis of DCEs are needed. To define best practice, further research is needed to test how the process of communicating risk affects the way in which people value risk attributes in DCEs. Copyright Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Harrison & Dan Rigby & Caroline Vass & Terry Flynn & Jordan Louviere & Katherine Payne, 2014. "Risk as an Attribute in Discrete Choice Experiments: A Systematic Review of the Literature," The Patient: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research, Springer;Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, vol. 7(2), pages 151-170, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:patien:v:7:y:2014:i:2:p:151-170
    DOI: 10.1007/s40271-014-0048-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Thesis Thursday: Caroline Vass
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2017-12-21 13:00:52

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    Cited by:

    1. Ellen M. Janssen & Jodi B. Segal & John F. P. Bridges, 2016. "A Framework for Instrument Development of a Choice Experiment: An Application to Type 2 Diabetes," The Patient: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research, Springer;Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, vol. 9(5), pages 465-479, October.

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