IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/minecn/v31y2018i1d10.1007_s13563-017-0121-z.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Mineral rents and social orders: when Radetzki meets Douglass North

Author

Listed:
  • Olivier Bomsel

    (MINES ParisTech, PSL Research University, CERNA—Centre for industrial economics, i3, CNRS)

Abstract

The “social orders” conceptual framework published in 2009 by Douglass North, John Joseph Wallis, and Barry Weingast allows a new reading of the political economy of rents in mineral-exporting countries. The paper explores how some findings of mineral economics research from the 1980s and 1990s can be reassessed within this framework.

Suggested Citation

  • Olivier Bomsel, 2018. "Mineral rents and social orders: when Radetzki meets Douglass North," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 31(1), pages 7-11, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:minecn:v:31:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s13563-017-0121-z
    DOI: 10.1007/s13563-017-0121-z
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13563-017-0121-z
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted.

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1007/s13563-017-0121-z?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bomsel, Olivier, 1992. "Collapse of the state and competitiveness : Evidence from African and post- socialist countries," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 270-281, December.
    2. North,Douglass C. & Wallis,John Joseph & Weingast,Barry R., 2013. "Violence and Social Orders," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781107646995, May.
    3. Avner Greif & Guido Tabellini, 2010. "Cultural and Institutional Bifurcation: China and Europe Compared," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 135-140, May.
    4. Radetzki, Marian, 1982. "Regional development benefits of mineral projects," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 193-200, September.
    5. North,Douglass C. & Wallis,John Joseph & Webb,Steven B. & Weingast,Barry R. (ed.), 2013. "In the Shadow of Violence," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781107684911, October.
    6. North,Douglass C. & Wallis,John Joseph & Webb,Steven B. & Weingast,Barry R. (ed.), 2013. "In the Shadow of Violence," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781107014213, October.
    7. Corden, W Max & Neary, J Peter, 1982. "Booming Sector and De-Industrialisation in a Small Open Economy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(368), pages 825-848, December.
    8. Radetzki, Marian, 1989. "The role of state owned enterprises in the international metal mining industry," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 45-57, March.
    9. Robert Bates, 2010. "A Review of Douglass C. North, John Joseph Wallis, and Barry R. Weingast's Violence and Social Orders: A Conceptual Framework for Interpreting Recorded Human History," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 48(3), pages 752-756, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Sinha, Avik & Sengupta, Tuhin, 2019. "Impact of natural resource rents on human development: What is the role of globalization in Asia Pacific countries?," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 1-1.
    2. Oasis Kodila-Tedika, 2021. "Natural resource governance: does social media matter?," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 34(1), pages 127-140, April.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Mehrdad Vahabi, 2020. "Introduction: a symposium on the predatory state," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 182(3), pages 233-242, March.
    2. Wegner, Gerhard, 2013. "Capitalist transformation without political participation: German capitalism in the first half of the 19th century," Freiburg Discussion Papers on Constitutional Economics 13/14, Walter Eucken Institut e.V..
    3. John Wallis, 2015. "Rules, Organizations, and Governments," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 43(1), pages 69-86, March.
    4. Gerard Clarke, 2021. "“Thinking and Working Politically”: The case of donor‐supported reform coalitions in the Philippines," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 39(3), pages 398-418, May.
    5. Steven Webb, 2015. "Becoming an open democratic capitalist society: a two-century historical perspective on Germany’s evolving political economy," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 19-37, March.
    6. Mehrdad Vahabi, 2017. "A critical survey of the resource curse literature through the appropriability lens," CEPN Working Papers hal-01583559, HAL.
    7. Haass, Felix & Ottmann, Martin, 2017. "Profits from Peace: The Political Economy of Power-Sharing and Corruption," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 60-74.
    8. Gwendoline Promsopha & Antoine Vion, 2017. "Thailand's 'limited order trap' : a critical application of North, Wallis and Weingast," Post-Print hal-01612052, HAL.
    9. Mushtaq H. Khan, 2018. "Institutions and Asia's development: The role of norms and organizational power," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2018-132, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    10. Erik Grimmer-Solem, 2015. "The mature limited access order at the doorstep: Imperial Germany and contemporary China in transition," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 103-120, March.
    11. Tomasz Legiedz, 2020. "Economic policy for development and the new institutional economics," Catallaxy, Institute of Economic Research, vol. 5(2), pages 61-73, December.
    12. Gerhard Wegner, 2015. "Capitalist transformation without political participation: German capitalism in the first half of the nineteenth century," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 61-86, March.
    13. Robert Cameron & Brian Levy, 2016. "The potential and limits of performance management: Improving basic education in the Western Cape," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series esid-062-16, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    14. Alfred Reckendrees, 2015. "Weimar Germany: The first open access order that failed?," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 38-60, March.
    15. Farla, Kristine & de Crombrugghe, Denis & Verspagen, Bart, 2016. "Institutions, Foreign Direct Investment, and Domestic Investment: Crowding Out or Crowding In?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 1-9.
    16. Yakovlev, Andrei, 2016. "What is Russia trying to defend?," BOFIT Policy Briefs 2/2016, Bank of Finland, Bank of Finland Institute for Emerging Economies (BOFIT).
    17. Nadiia GRAZHEVSKA & Tetiana GAIDAI & Alla MOSTEPANIUK & Andrii ZAVAZHENKO, 2021. "Institutional dysfunctions as a factor of convergent-divergent institutional development of post-socialist countries," Access Journal, Access Press Publishing House, vol. 2(3), pages 290-308, September.
    18. Mehrdad Vahabi, 2018. "The resource curse literature as seen through the appropriability lens: a critical survey," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 175(3), pages 393-428, June.
    19. Daron Acemoglu & James A. Robinson, 2013. "Ekonomia kontra polityka: niebezpieczne rady w kwestiach polityki ekonomicznej," Gospodarka Narodowa. The Polish Journal of Economics, Warsaw School of Economics, issue 11-12, pages 113-136.
    20. Vahabi,Mehrdad, 2019. "The Political Economy of Predation," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781107591370, October.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:minecn:v:31:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s13563-017-0121-z. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Sonal Shukla or Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.