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Brain drain and technological relationship between skilled and unskilled labor: brain gain or brain loss?

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  • Xiaofeng Fan
  • Akira Yakita

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Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Xiaofeng Fan & Akira Yakita, 2011. "Brain drain and technological relationship between skilled and unskilled labor: brain gain or brain loss?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(4), pages 1359-1368, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:24:y:2011:i:4:p:1359-1368
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-010-0321-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Miyagiwa, Kaz, 1991. "Scale Economies in Education and the Brain Drain Problem," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 32(3), pages 743-759, August.
    2. Stark, Oded & Helmenstein, Christian & Prskawetz, Alexia, 1997. "A brain gain with a brain drain," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 227-234, August.
    3. Galor, Oded & Stark, Oded, 1991. "The Impact of Differences in the Levels of Technology on International Labor Migration," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 4(1), pages 1-12, March.
    4. Galor, Oded & Tsiddon, Daniel, 1997. "The Distribution of Human Capital and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 93-124, March.
    5. Panu Poutvaara, 2008. "On human capital formation with exit options: comment and new results," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(3), pages 679-684, July.
    6. Abdeslam Marfouk, 2007. "Brain Drain in Developing Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 21(2), pages 193-218, June.
    7. Michel Beine & Fréderic Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2008. "Brain Drain and Human Capital Formation in Developing Countries: Winners and Losers," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(528), pages 631-652, April.
    8. Beine, Michel & Docquier, Frederic & Rapoport, Hillel, 2001. "Brain drain and economic growth: theory and evidence," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 275-289, February.
    9. Daron Acemoglu, 1998. "Why Do New Technologies Complement Skills? Directed Technical Change and Wage Inequality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1055-1089.
    10. Andersen, Torben M., 2005. "Migration, taxation and educational incentives," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 87(3), pages 399-405, June.
    11. David Burgess, 2006. "Public Investment Criteria in Overlapping Generations Models of Open Economies," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 13(1), pages 59-78, January.
    12. H. G. Grubel & A. D. Scott, 1966. "The Immigration of Scientists and Engineers to the United States, 1949-61," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 368-368.
    13. Schiff, Maurice, 2005. "Brain Gain: Claims about Its Size and Impact on Welfare and Growth Are Greatly Exaggerated," IZA Discussion Papers 1599, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Bhagwati, Jagdish & Hamada, Koichi, 1974. "The brain drain, international integration of markets for professionals and unemployment : A theoretical analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 19-42, April.
    15. Galor, Oded, 1986. "Time preference and international labor migration," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 1-20, February.
    16. George E. Johnson, 1997. "Changes in Earnings Inequality: The Role of Demand Shifts," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(2), pages 41-54, Spring.
    17. Thomas Piketty, 1997. "Immigration et justice sociale," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 48(5), pages 1291-1309.
    18. Fumio OHTAKE, 2008. "Inequality in Japan," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 3(1), pages 87-109.
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    Cited by:

    1. Raphael Nawrotzki & Fernando Riosmena & Lori Hunter, 2013. "Do Rainfall Deficits Predict U.S.-Bound Migration from Rural Mexico? Evidence from the Mexican Census," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 32(1), pages 129-158, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Brain drain; Brain gain; Brain loss; F22; I28;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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