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Child Mobility, Maternal Status, and Household Composition in Rural South Africa

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  • Sangeetha Madhavan

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  • Enid Schatz
  • Samuel Clark
  • Mark Collinson

Abstract

This article examines the influence of maternal status, socioeconomic status of the household, and household composition on the mobility of children aged 0–14 in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa, from 1999 to 2008. Using data from the Agincourt Health and Demographic Surveillance System, we found that children whose mothers were temporary migrants, living elsewhere, or dead had higher odds of moving than children whose mothers were coresident. Older children and children living in richer households faced lower odds of mobility. For children whose mothers were coresident, there was no effect of maternal substitutes on child mobility. However, among children whose mothers were temporary migrants or living elsewhere, the presence of prime-aged and elderly females lowered the odds of mobility. For maternal orphans, the presence of elderly women in the household lowered their odds of mobility. The results underscore the importance of examining the conditions under which children move in order to strengthen service delivery targeted at safeguarding children’s well-being. Copyright Population Association of America 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Sangeetha Madhavan & Enid Schatz & Samuel Clark & Mark Collinson, 2012. "Child Mobility, Maternal Status, and Household Composition in Rural South Africa," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(2), pages 699-718, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:49:y:2012:i:2:p:699-718 DOI: 10.1007/s13524-011-0087-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin Brockerhoff, 1990. "Rural-to-Urban migration and child survival in Senegal," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 27(4), pages 601-616, November.
    2. Case, Anne & Deaton, Angus, 1998. "Large Cash Transfers to the Elderly in South Africa," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(450), pages 1330-1361, September.
    3. Sara Curran & Estela Rivero-Fuentes, 2003. "Engendering migrant networks: The case of Mexican migration," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 40(2), pages 289-307, May.
    4. Robert Moffitt, 2005. "Remarks on the analysis of causal relationships in population research," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(1), pages 91-108, February.
    5. Madhavan, Sangeetha, 2004. "Fosterage patterns in the age of AIDS: continuity and change," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(7), pages 1443-1454, April.
    6. Randall Kuhn & Bethany Everett & Rachel Silvey, 2011. "The Effects of Children’s Migration on Elderly Kin’s Health: A Counterfactual Approach," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(1), pages 183-209, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lauren Gaydosh, 2015. "Childhood Risk of Parental Absence in Tanzania," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(4), pages 1121-1146, August.
    2. repec:dem:demres:v:37:y:2017:i:59 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Katharine Hall, 2016. "Maternal and child migration in post-apartheid South Africa: evidence from the NIDS panel study," SALDRU Working Papers 178, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    4. Arlette Simo-Fotso, 2016. "Child Disability and Siblings’ Healthcare Expenditures in a Context of Child Fostering," Working Papers 224, Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED).
    5. Carren Ginsburg & Philippe Bocquier & Donatien Beguy & Sulaimon Afolabi & Orvalho Augusto & Karim Derra & Frank Odhiambo & Mark Otiende & Abdramane Soura & Pascal Zabré & Michael J. White & Mark Colli, 2016. "Human capital on the move: Education as a determinant of internal migration in selected INDEPTH surveillance populations in Africa," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 34(30), pages 845-884, May.
    6. repec:spr:soinre:v:133:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1397-z is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Children; Mobility; Household; Mothers; South Africa;

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