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Early origins of the gradient: the relationship between socioeconomic status and infant mortality in the United States

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  • Brian Finch

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  • Brian Finch, 2003. "Early origins of the gradient: the relationship between socioeconomic status and infant mortality in the United States," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 40(4), pages 675-699, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:40:y:2003:i:4:p:675-699
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.2003.0033
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1995:85:1:20-25_3 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. James P. Smith, 1999. "Healthy Bodies and Thick Wallets: The Dual Relation between Health and Economic Status," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 145-166, Spring.
    3. Sean Becketti, 1995. "Calculating and graphing fractional polynomials," Stata Technical Bulletin, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(24).
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    Cited by:

    1. Elder, Todd E. & Goddeeris, John H. & Haider, Steven J., 2016. "Racial and ethnic infant mortality gaps and the role of socio-economic status," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 42-54.
    2. Philip B Mason & Frank M. Howell & Jeremy R. Porter, 2014. "Examining Rural-Urban Obesity Trends among Youth in the U.S.: Testing the Socioeconomic Gradient Hypothesis," International Journal of Business and Social Research, MIR Center for Socio-Economic Research, vol. 4(12), pages 27-42, December.
    3. Jackson, Margot I. & Mayne, Patrick, 2016. "Child access to the nutritional safety net during and after the Great Recession: The case of WIC," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 170(C), pages 197-207.
    4. Ling, Davina C., 2009. "Do the Chinese "Keep up with the Jones"?: Implications of peer effects, growing economic disparities and relative deprivation on health outcomes among older adults in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 65-81, March.
    5. Joop Garssen & Anouschka van der Meulen, 2004. "Perinatal mortality in the Netherlands. Backgrounds of a worsening international ranking," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 11(13), pages 357-394, December.
    6. Hajizadeh, Mohammad & Nandi, Arijit & Heymann, Jody, 2014. "Social inequality in infant mortality: What explains variation across low and middle income countries?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 36-46.
    7. Katarina Rosicova & Andrea Madarasova Geckova & Jitse Dijk & Jana Kollarova & Martin Rosic & Johan Groothoff, 2011. "Regional socioeconomic indicators and ethnicity as predictors of regional infant mortality rate in Slovakia," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 56(5), pages 523-531, October.
    8. Jackson, Margot I., 2015. "Early childhood WIC participation, cognitive development and academic achievement," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 145-153.
    9. repec:pri:cheawb:racial_disparities_chw_geruso_april2010 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Dowd, Jennifer Beam, 2007. "Early childhood origins of the income/health gradient: The role of maternal health behaviors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(6), pages 1202-1213, September.
    11. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0605-z is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Michael Geruso, 2012. "Black-White Disparities in Life Expectancy: How Much Can the Standard SES Variables Explain?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(2), pages 553-574, May.
    13. Quamruzzaman, Amm & Mendoza Rodríguez, José M. & Heymann, Jody & Kaufman, Jay S. & Nandi, Arijit, 2014. "Are tuition-free primary education policies associated with lower infant and neonatal mortality in low- and middle-income countries?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 153-159.

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