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Socioeconomic development, family planning, and fertility in China

Author

Listed:
  • Dudley Poston
  • Baochang Gu

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Dudley Poston & Baochang Gu, 1987. "Socioeconomic development, family planning, and fertility in China," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 24(4), pages 531-551, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:24:y:1987:i:4:p:531-551
    DOI: 10.2307/2061390
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Unknown, 1985. "Book Review," Review of Marketing and Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 53(02), pages 1-2, August.
    2. Unknown, 1985. "Book Review," Review of Marketing and Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 53(03), pages 1-2, December.
    3. Unknown, 1985. "Book Reviews," Australian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 29(1), pages 1-12, April.
    4. Unknown, 1985. "Book Reviews," Review of Marketing and Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 53(01), pages 1-37, April.
    5. Unknown, 1985. "Book Reviews," Australian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 29(2), pages 1-14, August.
    6. Unknown, 1985. "Book Reviews," Australian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 29(3), pages 1-12, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Junsen Zhang, 2017. "The Evolution of China's One-Child Policy and Its Effects on Family Outcomes," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 31(1), pages 141-160, Winter.
    2. Zhongwei Zhao & Guangyu Zhang, 2018. "Socioeconomic Factors Have Been the Major Driving Force of China’s Fertility Changes Since the Mid-1990s," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 55(2), pages 733-742, April.
    3. Yun Liang & John Gibson, 2017. "Location or Hukou: What Most Limits Fertility of Urban Women in China?," Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(3), pages 527-540, September.
    4. Feng Wang & Yong Cai & Ke Shen & Stuart Gietel-Basten, 2018. "Is Demography Just a Numerical Exercise? Numbers, Politics, and Legacies of China’s One-Child Policy," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 55(2), pages 693-719, April.
    5. Bloom, David E. & Canning, David & Hu, Linlin & Liu, Yuanli & Mahal, Ajay & Yip, Winnie, 2010. "The contribution of population health and demographic change to economic growth in China and India," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 17-33, March.
    6. Yong Cai, 2010. "China's Below‐Replacement Fertility: Government Policy or Socioeconomic Development?," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 36(3), pages 419-440, September.
    7. Wang, Jiamin, 2008. "China's Regional Disparity in Demographic Transition: A Spatial Analysis," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 38(3), pages 289-317.
    8. Li, Bingjing & Zhang, Hongliang, 2017. "Does population control lead to better child quality? Evidence from China’s one-child policy enforcement," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 246-260.
    9. Fei Wang & Liqiu Zhao & Zhong Zhao, 2017. "China’s family planning policies and their labor market consequences," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(1), pages 31-68, January.
    10. Zhen Guo & Zheng Wu & Christoph Schimmele & Shuzhuo Li, 2012. "The Effect of Urbanization on China’s Fertility," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 31(3), pages 417-434, June.
    11. Xianling Zhang & Fei Guo & Zhenwu Zhai, 2019. "China’s Demographic Future Under the New Two-Child Policy," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 38(4), pages 537-563, August.
    12. Wei Huang, 2017. "How does the one child policy impact social and economic outcomes?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 387-387, September.

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