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Household structure and labor force participation of black, hispanic, and white mothers


  • Marta Tienda
  • Jennifer Glass


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Marta Tienda & Jennifer Glass, 1985. "Household structure and labor force participation of black, hispanic, and white mothers," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 22(3), pages 381-394, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:22:y:1985:i:3:p:381-394
    DOI: 10.2307/2061067

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Yinger, John, 1976. "Racial prejudice and racial residential segregation in an urban model," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 383-396, October.
    2. George Galster, 1988. "Residential segregation in American cities: A contrary review," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 7(2), pages 93-112, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Heather Antecol & Kelly Bedard, 2002. "The Decision to Work by Married Immigrant Women: The Role of Extended Family Households," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2002-34, Claremont Colleges.
    2. Huffman, Wallace E., 1988. "Effects of Local Economic Conditions On Poverty Status of U.S. Rural Husband-Wife Households," ISU General Staff Papers 198812160800001196, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    3. Li, Hongbin & Yi, Junjian & Zhang, Junsen, 2015. "Fertility, Household Structure, and Parental Labor Supply: Evidence from Rural China," IZA Discussion Papers 9342, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Teresa Ciabattari, 2005. "Single Mothers, Social Capital, and Work-Family Conflict," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 05-118, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    5. Robert Weller & Isaac Eberstein & Mohamed Bailey, 1987. "Pregnancy Wantedness And Maternal Behavior During Pregnancy," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 24(3), pages 407-412, August.
    6. Noonan, Mary C. & Smith, Sandra S. & Corcoran, Mary E., 2005. "Examining the Impact of Welfare Reform, Labor Market Conditions, and the Earned Income Tax Credit on the Employment of Black and White Single Mothers," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt7x25h6h3, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.

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