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The role of technology for achieving climate policy objectives: overview of the EMF 27 study on global technology and climate policy strategies

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  • Elmar Kriegler

    ()

  • John Weyant
  • Geoffrey Blanford
  • Volker Krey
  • Leon Clarke
  • Jae Edmonds
  • Allen Fawcett
  • Gunnar Luderer
  • Keywan Riahi
  • Richard Richels
  • Steven Rose
  • Massimo Tavoni
  • Detlef Vuuren

Abstract

This article presents the synthesis of results from the Stanford Energy Modeling Forum Study 27, an inter-comparison of 18 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. The study investigated the importance of individual mitigation options such as energy intensity improvements, carbon capture and storage (CCS), nuclear power, solar and wind power and bioenergy for climate mitigation. Limiting the atmospheric greenhouse gas concentration to 450 or 550 ppm CO 2 equivalent by 2100 would require a decarbonization of the global energy system in the 21 st century. Robust characteristics of the energy transformation are increased energy intensity improvements and the electrification of energy end use coupled with a fast decarbonization of the electricity sector. Non-electric energy end use is hardest to decarbonize, particularly in the transport sector. Technology is a key element of climate mitigation. Versatile technologies such as CCS and bioenergy are found to be most important, due in part to their combined ability to produce negative emissions. The importance of individual low-carbon electricity technologies is more limited due to the many alternatives in the sector. The scale of the energy transformation is larger for the 450 ppm than for the 550 ppm CO 2 e target. As a result, the achievability and the costs of the 450 ppm target are more sensitive to variations in technology availability. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Elmar Kriegler & John Weyant & Geoffrey Blanford & Volker Krey & Leon Clarke & Jae Edmonds & Allen Fawcett & Gunnar Luderer & Keywan Riahi & Richard Richels & Steven Rose & Massimo Tavoni & Detlef Vuu, 2014. "The role of technology for achieving climate policy objectives: overview of the EMF 27 study on global technology and climate policy strategies," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 123(3), pages 353-367, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:climat:v:123:y:2014:i:3:p:353-367
    DOI: 10.1007/s10584-013-0953-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gunnar Luderer & Valentina Bosetti & Michael Jakob & Marian Leimbach & Jan Steckel & Henri Waisman & Ottmar Edenhofer, 2012. "The economics of decarbonizing the energy system—results and insights from the RECIPE model intercomparison," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 114(1), pages 9-37, September.
    2. John P. Weyant, Francisco C. de la Chesnaye, and Geoff J. Blanford, 2006. "Overview of EMF-21: Multigas Mitigation and Climate Policy," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 1-32.
    3. Ottmar Edenhofer , Brigitte Knopf, Terry Barker, Lavinia Baumstark, Elie Bellevrat, Bertrand Chateau, Patrick Criqui, Morna Isaac, Alban Kitous, Socrates Kypreos, Marian Leimbach, Kai Lessmann, Bertra, 2010. "The Economics of Low Stabilization: Model Comparison of Mitigation Strategies and Costs," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I).
    4. Ruben Bibas & Aurélie Méjean, 2012. "Potential and limitations of bioenergy options for low carbon transitions," CIRED Working Papers hal-00866407, HAL.
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