IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

A spatio-temporal analysis of population and employment growth for Southern California

  • Simon Choi

    ()

  • Changkeun Park

    ()

  • JiYoung Park

    ()

Registered author(s):

    The population–employment (P–E) relationship in the multicounty region has not been considered enough to document, although numerous future regional policy issues affecting local areas have required producing a technically sound and politically acceptable projection of population or employment with the US metropolitan planning organizations. This study intended to answer two key questions based on the county-level data sets of P–E ratio for Southern California. First, we investigated whether the Southern California region has been or will be experiencing any convergence in the P–E ratio gap among counties in the long-term perspective. Second, we tested to understand whether a vector autoregression (VAR) approach contributes to developing the county-level P–E ratio projection model for the region. Finally, we validated the VAR projections using independent data sets. The quantified information in the present study can help regional and subregional stakeholders encourage and initiate an effective discussion about the future of the region. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00168-013-0572-2
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Springer in its journal The Annals of Regional Science.

    Volume (Year): 52 (2014)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 19-40

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:52:y:2014:i:1:p:19-40
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00168/index.htm

    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information: Web: http://link.springer.de/orders.htm

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Hoover, Edgar M., 1941. "Interstate Redistribution of Population, 1850–1940," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(02), pages 199-205, November.
    2. Thomas de Graaff & Frank G. van Oort & Raymond J.G.M. Florax, 2011. "Regional Population-Employment Dynamics across Different Sectors of the Economy," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-129/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    3. Gerke Hoogstra & Jouke Van Dijk & Raymond J.G.M. Florax, 2005. "Do jobs follow people or people follow jobs? A meta-analysis of Carlino-Mills studies," ERSA conference papers ersa05p737, European Regional Science Association.
    4. Steinnes, Donald N., 1977. "Causality and intraurban location," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 69-79, January.
    5. Mills, Edwin S. & Price, Richard, 1984. "Metropolitan suburbanization and central city problems," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 1-17, January.
    6. Cooke, Timothy W., 1978. "Causality reconsidered: A note," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 538-542, October.
    7. Edward L. Glaeser & Giacomo A. M. Ponzetto, 2010. "Did the Death of Distance Hurt Detroit and Help New York?," NBER Chapters, in: Agglomeration Economics, pages 303-337 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Thurston Lawrence & Yezer Anthony M. J., 1994. "Causality in the Suburbanization of Population and Employment," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 105-118, January.
    9. G F Mulligan & A C Vias & S M Glavac, 1999. "Initial diagnostics of a regional adjustment model," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 31(5), pages 855-876, May.
    10. Marlon G. Boarnet & Kenneth Joh & Walter Siembab & William Fulton & Mai Thi Nguyen, 2011. "Retrofitting the Suburbs to Increase Walking: Evidence from a Land-use-Travel Study," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 48(1), pages 129-159, January.
    11. Gordon Mulligan & Mark Partridge & John Carruthers, 2012. "Central place theory and its reemergence in regional science," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 405-431, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:52:y:2014:i:1:p:19-40. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla)

    or (Christopher F Baum)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.