IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/sls/ipmsls/v6y20033.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Differences in Annual Work Hours per Capita between the United States and Canada

Author

Listed:
  • Pierre Fortin

    ()

Abstract

In addition to productivity levels, living standards, as measured by GDP per capita, are determined by both average hours worked per person employed and the share of employment in the total population employed. In this article, Pierre Fortin from the University of Quebec at Montreal examines differences in annual work hours on a per capita basis between the United States and Canada. He finds that in 2001 average hours worked was lower in Canada (91 per cent of the U.S. level), while the employment/total population ratio was actually higher in Canada (103 per cent of the U.S. level). With output per hour in Canada 90 per cent of the U.S. level, the overall effect of these three variables was to produce a level of GDP per capita in Canada that was 85 per cent of the U.S. level. He also finds that Ontario in 2001 had enjoyed a higher level of GDP per capita than Quebec (86 per cent versus 77 per cent of the U.S. level) because of its greater average hours worked and higher employment/total population ratio, offset by a slightly lower productivity level.

Suggested Citation

  • Pierre Fortin, 2003. "Differences in Annual Work Hours per Capita between the United States and Canada," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 6, pages 38-46, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:sls:ipmsls:v:6:y:2003:3
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.csls.ca/ipm/6/fortin-e.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.csls.ca/ipm/6/fortin-f.pdf
    File Function: version en francais, pp:43-51
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael Baker & Jonathan Gruber & Kevin Milligan, 2003. "The retirement incentive effects of Canada's Income Security programs," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 36(2), pages 261-290, May.
    2. Robert J. Gordon, 2004. "Two Centuries of Economic Growth: Europe Chasing the American Frontier," NBER Working Papers 10662, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Richard B. Freeman, 2000. "The US Economic Model at Y2K: Lodestar for Advanced Capitalism?," NBER Working Papers 7757, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Courtney Coile & Jonathan Gruber, 2000. "Social Security and Retirement," NBER Working Papers 7830, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Heisz, Andrew & Larochelle-Cote, Sebastien, 2003. "Working Hours in Canada and the United States," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2003209e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    2. Andrew Sharpe, 2007. "Lessons for Canada from International Productivity Experience," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 14, pages 20-37, Spring.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Canada; United States; Hours; Hours of Work; Average Hours; Leisure; Labour Productivity; Well-being; Wellbeing; Welfare;

    JEL classification:

    • O51 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - U.S.; Canada
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sls:ipmsls:v:6:y:2003:3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (CSLS). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cslssca.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.