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The US Economic Model at Y2K: Lodestar for Advanced Capitalism?

  • Richard B. Freeman

The 1990s economic performance of the US suggests that the country may have the right mix of institutions and policies to be the peak capitalist economy in the new information economy. This paper develops criterion for judging peak status and examines whether the US fulfills these criterion. The US's employment and productivity performance make it a legitimate candidate for peak, but the record in distribution does not. As the late 1990s boom raised the wages of low skill workers, continued full employment will greatly strengthen the case for the US as peak economy. But with anything less than full employment the US economy will lose its luster. Even if this occurs, however, the US record in employing women and extending ownership to many workers deserves attention.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w7757.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 7757.

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Date of creation: Jun 2000
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Publication status: published as Freeman, Ricahrd B. "The US Economic Model at Y2K: Lodestar for Advanced Capitalism?" Canadian Public Policy / Analyse de Politiques, Vol. 26, Supplement: Structural Aspects of Unemployment in Canada (Jul., 2000): S187-S200.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:7757
Note: LS
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  1. David Card & Francis Kramarz & Thomas Lemieux, 1995. "Changes in the Relative Structure of Wages and Employment: A Comparison of the United States, Canada, and France," Working Papers 734, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  2. Kreps, David M., 1990. "Game Theory and Economic Modelling," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198283812, March.
  3. Rebecca M. Blank & David Card, 1993. "Poverty, Income Distribution, and Growth: Are They Still Connected," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 24(2), pages 285-340.
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