IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/sae/sagope/v10y2020i3p2158244020945717.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Financial Literacy and Financial Risk Tolerance of Individual Investors: Multinomial Logistic Regression Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Yılmaz Bayar
  • H. Funda Sezgin
  • Ömer Faruk Öztürk
  • Mahmut Ãœnsal ÅžaÅŸmaz

Abstract

Financial risk tolerance is one of the important factors affecting the financial investment decisions of individuals and institutional investors and a crucial factor of financial planning and financial counseling. It is therefore necessary to determine the major determinants of risk tolerance. In this article, we researched the impact of financial literacy level and demographic characteristics on the financial risk tolerance of the individuals in the sample of Usak University staff, using a multinomial logistic regression analysis and retrieving data through the questionnaire method. Multinomial logistic regression is an extension of binary logistic regression, allowing for three or more categories of the dependent variable. The findings of the empirical analysis reveal that financial literacy and demographic characteristics of age, gender, education, and income levels are significant determinants of financial risk tolerance. In this regard, the improvements in the financial literacy of the individuals through various education programs will probably raise the demand of financial products with different risk characteristics and in turn contribute to the development of financial sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Yılmaz Bayar & H. Funda Sezgin & Ömer Faruk Öztürk & Mahmut Ãœnsal ÅžaÅŸmaz, 2020. "Financial Literacy and Financial Risk Tolerance of Individual Investors: Multinomial Logistic Regression Approach," SAGE Open, , vol. 10(3), pages 21582440209, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:sagope:v:10:y:2020:i:3:p:2158244020945717
    DOI: 10.1177/2158244020945717
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2158244020945717
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Grohmann, Antonia & Kouwenberg, Roy & Menkhoff, Lukas, 2014. "Financial literacy and its consequences in the emerging middleclass," Kiel Working Papers 1943, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    2. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2008. "Planning and Financial Literacy: How Do Women Fare?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 413-417, May.
    3. Lusardi, Annamaria & Mitchell, Olivia S., 2007. "Baby Boomer retirement security: The roles of planning, financial literacy, and housing wealth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 205-224, January.
    4. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S Mitchelli, 2007. "Financial Literacy and Retirement Preparedness: Evidence and Implications for Financial Education," Business Economics, Palgrave Macmillan;National Association for Business Economics, vol. 42(1), pages 35-44, January.
    5. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia Mitchell, 2006. "Financial Literacy and Retirement Preparedness: Evidence and Implications for Financial Education Programs," Working Papers wp144, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    6. Cohn, Richard A, et al, 1975. "Individual Investor Risk Aversion and Investment Portfolio Composition," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 30(2), pages 605-620, May.
    7. Fisher, Patti J. & Yao, Rui, 2017. "Gender differences in financial risk tolerance," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 191-202.
    8. Ryan Gibson & David Michayluk & Gerhard Van de Venter, 2013. "Financial risk tolerance: An analysis of unexplored factors," Published Paper Series 2013-1, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
    9. Dwyer, Peggy D. & Gilkeson, James H. & List, John A., 2002. "Gender differences in revealed risk taking: evidence from mutual fund investors," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 151-158, July.
    10. Adem Anbar & Melek Eker, 2010. "An Empirical Investigation for Determining of the Relation Between Personal Financial Risk Tolerance and Demographic Characteristic," Ege Academic Review, Ege University Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences, vol. 10(2), pages 503-522.
    11. Emanuele Bajo & Massimiliano Barbi & Sandro Sandri, 2015. "Financial Literacy, Households' Investment Behavior, and Risk Propensity," Journal of Financial Management, Markets and Institutions, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 1, pages 157-174, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Florian Deuflhard & Dimitris Georgarakos & Roman Inderst, 2019. "Financial Literacy and Savings Account Returns," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 17(1), pages 131-164.
    2. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell & Vilsa Curto, 2009. "Financial Literacy among the Young: Evidence and Implications for Consumer Policy," CeRP Working Papers 91, Center for Research on Pensions and Welfare Policies, Turin (Italy).
    3. van Rooij, Maarten & Lusardi, Annamaria & Alessie, Rob, 2011. "Financial literacy and stock market participation," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(2), pages 449-472, August.
    4. Lührmann, Melanie & Serra-Garcia, Marta & Winter, Joachim, 2015. "Teaching teenagers in finance: Does it work?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 160-174.
    5. Linh Nguyen & Gerry Gallery & Cameron Newton, 2019. "The joint influence of financial risk perception and risk tolerance on individual investment decision‐making," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 59(S1), pages 747-771, April.
    6. Noemi Oggero & Maria Cristina Rossi & Elisa Ughetto, 2020. "Entrepreneurial spirits in women and men. The role of financial literacy and digital skills," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 55(2), pages 313-327, August.
    7. Feng, Xiangnan & Lu, Bin & Song, Xinyuan & Ma, Shuang, 2019. "Financial literacy and household finances: A Bayesian two-part latent variable modeling approach," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 119-137.
    8. Salem, Razan, 2019. "Examining the investment behavior of Arab women in the stock market," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 151-160.
    9. Shen, Chung-Hua & Lin, Shih-Jie & Tang, De-Piao & Hsiao, Yu-Jen, 2016. "The relationship between financial disputes and financial literacy," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 46-65.
    10. Alessandro Bucciol & Martina Manfre' & Marcella Veronesi, 2018. "The Role of Financial Literacy and Money Education on Wealth Decisions," Working Papers 05/2018, University of Verona, Department of Economics.
    11. Fisher, Patti J. & Yao, Rui, 2017. "Gender differences in financial risk tolerance," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 191-202.
    12. Lin, Chaonan & Hsiao, Yu-Jen & Yeh, Cheng-Yung, 2017. "Financial literacy, financial advisors, and information sources on demand for life insurance," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 218-237.
    13. Ruben Cox & Dirk Brounen & Peter Neuteboom, 2015. "Financial Literacy, Risk Aversion and Choice of Mortgage Type by Households," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 50(1), pages 74-112, January.
    14. M. Debbich, 2015. "Why Financial Advice Cannot Substitute for Financial Literacy?," Working papers 534, Banque de France.
    15. Elizabeth Lyon & J. R. Catlin, 2020. "Consumer Misconceptions about Tax Laws: Results from a Survey in the United States," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 43(4), pages 807-828, December.
    16. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2008. "Planning and Financial Literacy: How Do Women Fare?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 413-417, May.
    17. Hero Ashman & Seth Neumuller, 2020. "Can Income Differences Explain the Racial Wealth Gap: A Quantitative Analysis," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 35, pages 220-239, January.
    18. Eduardo Fajnzylber & Gonzalo Reyes, 2015. "Knowledge, Information, and Retirement Saving Decisions: Evidence from a Large-Scale Intervention in Chile," Economía Journal, The Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association - LACEA, vol. 0(Spring 20), pages 83-117, February.
    19. Lusardi, Annamaria & Mitchell, Olivia S., 2007. "Financial literacy and retirement planning: New evidence from the Rand American Life Panel," CFS Working Paper Series 2007/33, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    20. Gerhard, Patrick & Hoffmann, Arvid O.I. & Post, Thomas, 2017. "Past performance framing and investors’ belief updating: Is seeing long-term returns always associated with smaller belief updates?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(C), pages 38-51.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sae:sagope:v:10:y:2020:i:3:p:2158244020945717. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (SAGE Publications). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.