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The Role of Space in Public Capital Research

Author

Listed:
  • Brian A. Mikelbank

    (Department of Geography, The Ohio State University, Mikelbank.1@osu.edu)

  • Randall W. Jackson

    (Department of Geography, The Ohio State University, Jackson.21@osu.edu)

Abstract

The role of public capital in the economy is an emerging research area with theoretical significance and societal and policy relevance. Several academic disciplines and public institutions are regular contributors to this research field. The range of findings of these studies extends from virtually no role to a very strong role for public capital in the economy. Reconciling the varied and sometimes contradictory results has not been a high priority among researchers. The lack of attention to spatial forces, an issue gaining attention only relatively recently, also has been troublesome. This article reviews public capital research along three primary dimensions: the dependent variable, scale of analysis, and attention to spatial processes. The authors emphasize scale and space as among the most important but least discussed differences among public capital studies and then focus on the nature of the economic processes at work and detectable at different scales of analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Brian A. Mikelbank & Randall W. Jackson, 2000. "The Role of Space in Public Capital Research," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 23(3), pages 235-258, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:inrsre:v:23:y:2000:i:3:p:235-258
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    1. repec:eee:chieco:v:49:y:2018:i:c:p:143-153 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Pereira, Alfredo Marvao & Roca-Sagales, Oriol, 2003. "Spillover effects of public capital formation: evidence from the Spanish regions," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 238-256, March.
    3. Mark Partridge & Dan Rickman, 2010. "Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Modelling for Regional Economic Development Analysis," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(10), pages 1311-1328.
    4. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Yannis Psycharis & Vassilis Tselios, 2012. "Public investment and regional growth and convergence: Evidence from Greece," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 91(3), pages 543-568, August.
    5. Holl, Adelheid, 2004. "Manufacturing location and impacts of road transport infrastructure: empirical evidence from Spain," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 341-363, May.
    6. Alfredo M. Pereira & Jorge M. Andraz, 2013. "On The Economic Effects Of Public Infrastructure Investment: A Survey Of The International Evidence," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 38(4), pages 1-37, December.
    7. Pedro R.D. Bom & Jenny E. Ligthart, 2014. "What Have We Learned From Three Decades Of Research On The Productivity Of Public Capital?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(5), pages 889-916, December.
    8. Iain Begg, 2002. "'Investability': The Key to Competitive Regions and Cities?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 187-193.
    9. Pelayo Arbués & Matias Mayor & José Ba-os, 2014. "Productivity and accessibility of road transportation infrastructure in Spain: a spatial econometric approach," Chapters,in: Accessibility and Spatial Interaction, chapter 9, pages 177-194 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Daniel Montolio & Albert Solé-Ollé, 2009. "Road investment and regional productivity growth: the effects of vehicle intensity and congestion," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(1), pages 99-118, March.
    11. Alfredo Pereira & Jorge Andraz, 2012. "On the regional incidence of highway investments in the USA," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 48(3), pages 819-838, June.
    12. Pedro R. D. Bom & Jenny Ligthart, 2008. "How Productive is Public Capital? A Meta-Analysis," CESifo Working Paper Series 2206, CESifo Group Munich.
    13. Chang K. Seung & David S. Kraybill, 2001. "The Effects of Infrastructure Investment: A Two-Sector Dynamic Computable General Equilibrium Analysis for Ohio," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 24(2), pages 261-281, April.
    14. Pedro R.D. Bom & Jenny E. Ligthart, 2009. "How Productive is Public Capital? A Meta-Regression Analysis," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper0912, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.

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