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The Stigma of Unemployment: Are Unemployed People Seen As Less Productive? A Survey of Employers in Sunyani, Ghana

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  • Joseph Amankwah

Abstract

The objective of the paper is to explore the nature of sigma of unemployment and its effect on hiring in organisation from the perspective of employers in order to contribute to the body of knowledge that exist in the area of the causes of unemployment. The paper is based on quantitative, exploratory, cross-sectional and a survey study. The target population is the employers in Sunyani Township. The sample size is 115 selected through convenience sampling method. Data was collected using self-design questionnaire administered at the work places of the respondents. The questions were explained to the respondents before they answered the questions. The data collected was analysed using descriptive statistics. The results indicate that respondents in the survey do not hold significant stigma against the unemployed and are not biased against the unemployed in hiring. It is recommended that employers should not discriminate against unemployed since such practices harm employer‟s competitiveness by eliminating qualified unemployed persons from vacant job avenues. Future studies should examine the same issues from the perspective of the unemployed in a causal study using structural modeling in many communities.

Suggested Citation

  • Joseph Amankwah, 2015. "The Stigma of Unemployment: Are Unemployed People Seen As Less Productive? A Survey of Employers in Sunyani, Ghana," International Journal of Financial Economics, Research Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 4(2), pages 92-100.
  • Handle: RePEc:rss:jnljfe:v4i2p2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Omori, Yoshiaki, 1997. "Stigma Effects of Nonemployment," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(2), pages 394-416, April.
    4. Ben Lockwood, 1991. "Information Externalities in the Labour Market and the Duration of Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(4), pages 733-753.
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