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Keeping Down With The Joneses: Neighbors, Networks, And Wages

Author

Listed:
  • Manuel Pastor, Jr.

    (Occidental College)

  • Ara Robinson Adams

    (Occidental College)

Abstract

This paper looks at the effects of neighborhood location on wages for a sample of male workers in Los Angeles County. Controlling for the usual human capital and social variables, the poverty of one's neighborhood has a dampening effect on earnings, presumably because of the "lower quality" of job networks available in poor areas. This "concentrated poverty" or "network" effect seems to be more important in this sample than "spatial mismatch" or distance from employment; nonetheless, commuting (as well as moving) out of a poor neighborhood tends to raise wages, giving some support for recent policy attempts to increase the residential and employment mobility of inner-city residents.

Suggested Citation

  • Manuel Pastor, Jr. & Ara Robinson Adams, 1996. "Keeping Down With The Joneses: Neighbors, Networks, And Wages," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 26(2), pages 116-145, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v:27:y:1996:i:2:p:116-145
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. McMillen, Daniel P. & Singell, Larry Jr., 1992. "Work location, residence location, and the intraurban wage gradient," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 195-213, September.
    2. O'Regan, Katherine M. & Quigley, John M., 1991. "Labor market access and labor market outcomes for urban youth," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 277-293, July.
    3. Susan J. Popkin & James E. Rosenbaum & Patricia M. Meaden, 1993. "Labor market experiences of low-income black women in middle-class suburbs: Evidence from a survey of gautreaux program participants," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(3), pages 556-573.
    4. Edwin A. Sexton, 1991. "Residential Location, Workplace Location, And Black Earnings," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 21(1), pages 11-20, Spring.
    5. John Logan & Richard Alba, 1993. "Locational returns to human capital: Minority access to suburban community resources," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 30(2), pages 243-268, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Valerie Preston & Sara McLafferty, 1999. "articles: Spatial mismatch research in the 1990s: progress and potential," Papers in Regional Science, Springer;Regional Science Association International, vol. 78(4), pages 387-402.
    2. Shengyi Gao & Patricia Mokhtarian & Robert Johnston, 2008. "Exploring the connections among job accessibility, employment, income, and auto ownership using structural equation modeling," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 42(2), pages 341-356, June.
    3. Thomas A. Knapp & Nancy E. White, 2016. "The Effect Of Youth Poverty Rates And Migration On Adult Wages," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(2), pages 239-256, March.

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