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Search-and-Matching Analysis of High Unemployment Caused by the Zero Lower Bound

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  • Robert E. Hall

    (Stanford University)

Abstract

A basic principle of macroeconomics holds that an excessive real interest rate is the cause of high unemployment at the zero lower bound on the nominal interest rate. Absent the bound, the rate could be negative and the real rate could be low enough to restore full employment. Models backing up this principle make controversial assumptions about price-stickiness and the failure of market-clearing in the product market and sometimes in the labor market. This paper generates realistic effects of the zero lower bound without those assumptions, by substituting a search-and-matching setup in both the product and labor markets. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Robert E. Hall, 2016. "Search-and-Matching Analysis of High Unemployment Caused by the Zero Lower Bound," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 19, pages 210-217, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:14-322
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2015.12.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mortensen, Dale & Pissarides, Christopher, 2011. "Job Creation and Job Destruction in the Theory of Unemployment," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 1, pages 1-19.
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    5. Robert Shimer, 2005. "The Cyclical Behavior of Equilibrium Unemployment and Vacancies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 25-49, March.
    6. Greg Kaplan & Guido Menzio, 2016. "Shopping Externalities and Self-Fulfilling Unemployment Fluctuations," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 124(3), pages 771-825.
    7. Aleksander Berentsen & Guido Menzio & Randall Wright, 2011. "Inflation and Unemployment in the Long Run," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(1), pages 371-398, February.
    8. Gauti B. Eggertsson & Paul Krugman, 2012. "Debt, Deleveraging, and the Liquidity Trap: A Fisher-Minsky-Koo Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 127(3), pages 1469-1513.
    9. repec:pri:cepsud:234kaplan is not listed on IDEAS
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    Keywords

    Unemployment; DMP model; Zero lower bound;

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