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Wealth and Labor Supply Heterogeneity

Author

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  • Jose Mustre-del-Rio

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City)

Abstract

This paper examines the importance of ex-ante heterogeneity for understanding the relationship between wealth and labor supply when markets are incomplete. An infinite horizon model is estimated where labor supply is indivisible and households are ex-ante heterogeneous in their labor disutility and market skills. The model replicates key features of the distribution of employment, wages, and wealth observed in the data. Importantly, it reverses the prediction that employment falls with wealth, a pervasive feature of models without ex-ante heterogeneity. A byproduct of the model's empirical performance is that it implies labor supply responses to unanticipated wages changes (e.g., Frisch elasticities) that are a half to two-thirds of those recovered from models with only ex-post heterogeneity. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Jose Mustre-del-Rio, 2015. "Wealth and Labor Supply Heterogeneity," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(3), pages 619-634, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:12-158
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2014.09.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fernando Cirelli & Emilio Espino & Juan M. Sanchez, 2018. "Designing Unemployment Insurance for Developing Countries," Working Papers 2018-006, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised 10 Sep 2020.
    2. Nawid Siassi, 2019. "Inequality and the Marriage Gap," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 31, pages 160-181, January.
    3. Lei Fang & Anne Hannusch & Pedro Silos, 2020. "Bundling Time and Goods: Implications for Hours Dispersion," DETU Working Papers 2003, Department of Economics, Temple University.
    4. Minchul Yum, 2018. "On the distribution of wealth and employment," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 30, pages 86-105, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Indivisible labor; Frisch elasticity; Incomplete markets; Structural estimal;

    JEL classification:

    • C15 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Statistical Simulation Methods: General
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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