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China's Labour Market

  • Anthony Rush

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

Registered author(s):

    This article discusses some of the key characteristics of China's labour market, including the role of the changing demographic structure, the nature and composition of employment, as well as the important role of the country's rural migrant workforce.

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    File URL: http://www.rba.gov.au/publications/bulletin/2011/sep/pdf/bu-0911-4.pdf
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    Article provided by Reserve Bank of Australia in its journal RBA Bulletin.

    Volume (Year): (2011)
    Issue (Month): (September)
    Pages: 29-38

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    Handle: RePEc:rba:rbabul:sep2011-04
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    1. Juan Yang & Sylvie Démurger & Shi Li, 2010. "Earnings Differentials between the Public and the Private Sectors in China : Explaining Changing Trends for Urban Locals in the 2000s," Working Papers 1032, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique (GATE), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Université Lyon 2, Ecole Normale Supérieure.
    2. Giles, John & Park, Albert & Zhang, Juwei, 2005. "What is China's true unemployment rate?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 149-170.
    3. Zhao Chen & Ming Lu & Hiroshi Sato, 2009. "Social Networks and Labor Market Entry Barriers: Understanding Inter-industrial Wage Differentials in Urban China," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd09-084, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    4. Richard Herd & Vincent Koen & Anders Reutersward, 2010. "China's Labour Market in Transition: Job Creation, Migration and Regulation," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 749, OECD Publishing.
    5. Golley, Jane & Meng, Xin, 2011. "Has China run out of surplus labour?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 555-572.
    6. Jamie Hall & Andrew Stone, 2010. "Demography and Growth," RBA Bulletin, Reserve Bank of Australia, pages 15-23, June.
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